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Karin Bäckstrand and Eva Lövbrand

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Edited by Karin Bäckstrand and Eva Lövbrand

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Markus Lederer

This chapter explores how contemporary scholarship evaluates global climate change governance. It briefly describes how the literature on global governance of climate change evolved and why its overly optimistic outlook can no longer be upheld. The chapter will also provide an overview of current perspectives, differentiating between those who see the effective and legitimate global governance of climate change as a ‘glass half full,’ those who are agnostic about it, and those who argue that the glass is almost empty. Finally, the conclusion will provide possible scenarios as to where the real world of global governance of climate change might move and what follows for academic debate.
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Timothy Cadman, Lauren Eastwood, Federico Lopez-Casero Michaelis, Tek N. Maraseni, Jamie Pittock and Tapan Sarker

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Timothy Cadman, Lauren Eastwood, Federico Lopez-Casero Michaelis, Tek N. Maraseni, Jamie Pittock and Tapan Sarker

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Timothy Cadman, Lauren Eastwood, Federico Lopez-Casero Michaelis, Tek N. Maraseni, Jamie Pittock and Tapan Sarker

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Rasmus Gjedssø Bertelsen, Jens Christian Justinussen and Coco Smits

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Guri Bang, Arild Underdal and Steinar Andresen

In the Introduction we develop a conceptual framework designed for studying climate policy trajectories in countries with different political systems and with different energy mixes. The framework highlights factors that influence the likelihood for significant climate policy change. First, slow-changing factors that define the scope for climate policy change are identified as significant, in particular domestic fossil energy resource mix, energy security concerns and political institutional system. Second, the interplay between governmental supply of new policy initiatives and the level of societal demand for climate policy change is recognized as important for assessing the strength and form of pressure for climate policy change. The conceptual framework underpins the book’s in-depth analysis of climate policy development in seven key actors, and provides an important basis for understanding the prospects for a new international climate agreement.
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Edited by Guri Bang, Arild Underdal and Steinar Andresen

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Edited by Leif Christian Jensen and Geir Hønneland