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Adelina M. Broadbridge and Sandra L. Fielden

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Eric J. Bolland and Carlos J. Lopes

The aim of the book to learn more about successful and unsuccessful business decisions. Business decisions are consequential. Poor business decisions cause poor performance. Part of the purpose is to address the connection between business decisions and business performance. Decision making is defined in this chapter. Decision making involves risk. The chapter identifies those who make business decisions. Strategic business decisions are defined and tactical decisions are defined and differentiated. The evolution of business decisions is reviewed. The importance of exploring the book’s topic is explicated. Levels of decision making are described. Problems with decision making and performance measurement are discussed. The chapter also presents the plan for the remaining chapters.

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Emma Parry

This chapter draws upon existing research in order to examine the current state of knowledge in relation to age and careers. In doing this, it examines the process of the career and how this might develop across the life course, but also investigates the impact on age on individuals’ conceptalizations of career success and on individual preferences for career outcomes. The chapter seeks to synthesize what is a somewhat disparate literature in order to identify the practical implications of what is already known about age and careers and to suggest areas for future research.

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Israel Drori and Mike Wright

In this chapter, the editors, Mike Wright and Israel Drori, describe the variety of structures, processes and outcomes characterizing accelerators, based on their field research in accelerators across Europe, Israel and the US, and follow with an overview of the book, concluding with a summary of how accelerators are the building blocks of the new economy’s innovative ecosystems.

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Constant D. Beugré

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Constant D. Beugré

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Constant D. Beugré

This introductory chapter provides a working definition of the nascent field of organizational neuroscience, construed as the study of the neural basis of human behavior in organizations, and delineates it. Organizational neuroscience is a multidisciplinary field drawing knowledge from a variety of disciplines, including cognitive psychology, neuroeconomics, neuroscience, organizational science, and social cognitive neuroscience. It addresses three levels of analysis: the individual, group, and organizational levels. At the individual level, organizational neuroscience focuses on understanding the neural correlates of individual behavior in organizations. At the group level, organizational neuroscience scholars are concerned with the impact of neuroscience on group functioning and social interactions within organizations. An organizational-level analysis of organizational neuroscience focuses on the study of the neural basis of topics, such as organizational change, organizational culture, and organizational politics.

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Elaine Farndale, Wolfgang Mayrhofer and Chris Brewster

The subject of comparative human resource management (HRM) and its boundaries are established, discussing the role of context in HRM. The question is then raised whether globalisation is making such an analysis increasingly irrelevant as societies seem to converge. To investigate convergence further, the chapter explores levels and units of analysis of comparative HRM. The chapter also outlines the shape and content of the Handbook, which includes theoretical and empirical issues in comparative HRM, the way that these affect particular elements of HRM, and the way that different countries and regions think about the topic.

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Sabri Boubaker, Douglas Cumming and Duc Khuong Nguyen

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Constant D. Beugré