Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,233 items :

  • Asian Studies x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

References

A Critical Assessment

Chunlai Chen

This content is available to you

Preface

A Critical Assessment

Chunlai Chen

This content is available to you

Subhash C. Jain and Ben L. Kedia

This content is available to you

Introduction

A Critical Assessment

Chunlai Chen

Since the implementation of the market-oriented economic reform and open policies in late 1978, China has attracted massive foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows. Chapter 1 starts with an examination of the characteristics of FDI in China. It finds that FDI in China is characterized by fast growth and a huge amount of inflows; uneven regional distribution with heavy concentration in the coastal region; overwhelming concentration in the manufacturing and services sectors; and heavy engagement in the processing trade. The chapter then raises the main issues to be explored in this study: the impacts of FDI on China’s regional economic growth, urban–rural income inequality and urbanization development. To establish a theoretical framework for the empirical analysis, the chapter presents a compelling and thorough analysis of the leading theoretical explanations of FDI. Among the many theories, Dunning’s OLI framework has been the most influential and comprehensive explanation of FDI. As a result, it is used as the fundamental theoretical framework for this study. According to Dunning’s OLI framework, because of its ownership advantage and the possession of firm-specific intangible assets, FDI is expected to produce a series of impacts on a host country’s economy through capital formation, employment creation, and more importantly through knowledge spillovers to the host country’s domestic economy. Therefore, based on the theoretical framework derived from Dunning’s OLI paradigm, the chapter discusses the main implications of the existing theory for this study. Finally, the chapter outlines the structure of the study.

This content is available to you

Subhash C. Jain and Ben L. Kedia

The introductory chapter outlines the purpose of the book. As India gained independence, it faced the problem of economic development as well as a number of social and political problems which had to be addressed right away. Overall, India in the last 70 years of its independence has done remarkably well although it failed to realize its full potential in economic growth. This book argues that with free market policies and strong leadership, India could advance economically, thus benefiting all sections of the society.

This content is available to you

Foreword

A Critical Assessment

Chunlai Chen

This content is available to you

Shahid Yusuf

This content is available to you

Preface

Achieving Fiscal Sustainability

Edited by Naoyuki Yoshino and Peter J. Morgan

This content is available to you

Peter J. Morgan and Long Q. Trinh

Sustainable and inclusive growth in emerging Asian economies requires continued high levels of public sector investment in areas such as infrastructure, education, health, and social services. These responsibilities, especially with regard to infrastructure investment, need to be devolved increasingly to the regional government level. However, growth of sources of revenue and financing for local governments has not necessarily kept pace, forcing them, in some cases, to increase borrowing or cut spending below needed levels. This chapter reviews alternative models of the relationship between central and local governments, and provides an overview and assessment of different financing mechanisms for local governments, including tax revenues, central government transfers, bank loans, and bond issuance, with a focus on the context of emerging Asian economies. The chapter also reviews financing mechanisms for local governments and mechanisms for maintaining fiscal stability and sustainability at both the central and local government levels. Based upon the evidence on the decentralization process in Asia, it proposes some policy implications for improving central–local government relations and fiscal sustainability.

This content is available to you

Edited by W. J. Morgan, Qing Gu and Fengliang Li