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Edited by John R. McIntyre, Silvester Ivanaj and Vera Ivanaj

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Florence Legros

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Paul Shrivastava

Despite 40 years of research on sustainability, most of the commonly used measures of sustainability such as pollution, population, consumption, biodiversity and atmospheric carbon have all worsened on a global scale. This chapter suggests we must go beyond scientific research and study problems to solve what could be termed the real-world problems of global sustainability. It discusses transdisciplinary sustainability science that is impactful and responsive to stakeholders’ needs. It seeks to understand better the interactions between natural and human systems in key challenge areas, including global climate change, food–water–energy, biodiversity and natural assets, environmental impacts on health, oceans, urbanization, sustainable consumption and production, and governance processes. It also discusses what is termed Future Earth's “knowledge action networks” designed to develop transdisciplinary, stakeholder-engaged, co-designed solutions.

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Edited by John R. McIntyre, Silvester Ivanaj and Vera Ivanaj

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Victoria K. Wells, Diana Gregory-Smith and Danae Manika

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Sabri Boubaker, Douglas Cumming and Duc Khuong Nguyen

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Shawn Pope

Theorists have given strategic and political reasons to expect a relationship from advertising to CSR. Contrary to these expectations, the nearly 30 studies that have tested the relationship from advertising to CSR have yielded evidence that is surprisingly weak. The chapter systematically reviews this literature and conducts its own international panel study. The present findings also suggest the absence of a strong, robust link from advertising to CSR. In a concluding section, this chapter discusses the findings in light of other recent studies of CSR advertising and of CSR adoption motivations.

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Edited by Sabri Boubaker, Douglas Cumming and Duc K. Nguyen

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Mitsuru Kodama

Strategic innovation dynamically brings about strategic positioning through new products, services and business models, and is a dynamic view of strategy that enables a large corporation to maintain its competitiveness and establish sustainable growth. For these reasons, large corporations have to be innovators that can reinforce their existing positions (businesses) through incremental innovation, while at the same time constantly renew or destroy existing business through radical innovation. From detailed reviews of existing capabilities theories (resource-based theory of the firm, dynamic capabilities, and so on), and further theories deeply related to the characteristics of corporate or organizational capabilities and field data on sustainable growth of global corporations, this chapter presents the concept of a “Capabilities Map” derived from existing research into the characteristics of dynamic capabilities responding to environmental conditions such as dynamic temporal shifts and factors of uncertainly.

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Preface and acknowledgments

Driving Congruence in Capabilities

Mitsuru Kodama