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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

When reviewing the promotional materials of most colleges and universities in the United States, we are hard pressed to find any without the use of the word “leader” or “leadership.” Yet, when we delve deeper into their catalogues and websites, the numbers dwindle. Teaching leadership goes beyond mission statements in which leadership is articulated. This chapter reviews the evolution of teaching leadership and its place in higher education. We approach the teaching of leadership as having three conceptual approaches – as an intellectual enterprise (the study of leadership), a focus on competency-building (leadership training), and the promotion of leadership development. We frame the teaching of leadership through four levels of analysis – individual, team/community, organizational, and global. At the end of the chapter, we combine these two perspectives (the three conceptual approaches and the four levels of analysis) to create an overarching map of the different topics that are used in the teaching of leadership.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Alain Fayolle

Considering the current state of knowledge in entrepreneurship education, we call for a pragmatic and critical approach in the development of future perspectives on entrepreneurship education research. We highlight the need to develop research focusing on the three main dimensions: target, connect and reflect. Target refers to building theoretical foundations. Connect and reflect refer to bridging disciplines and communities (research and practice) and increasing the critical thinking perspective respectively. In this line of thoughts, this chapter presents the different contributions of the Research Agenda in Entrepreneurship Education book. This collective work is an attempt to promote innovative and to a certain extent provocative contributions aiming at producing knowledge on the three dimensions above. Our intention is to bring a significant value to entrepreneurship education researchers, policy-makers and practitioners.

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James D. Hart

Whether engaging investors, one’s team, board, customers or audience, effective communication is critical. These exercises aid entrepreneurs in developing communication skills and teach students how to inspire others and craft memorable and impactful stories. Students also learn about the power of stillness and finding one’s voice.

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Pedagogical features

In Search of a Multidisciplinary, Innovative and Integrated Approach

Edited by Jorge A. Arevalo and Shelley F. Mitchell

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Introduction

In Search of a Multidisciplinary, Innovative and Integrated Approach

Jorge A. Arevalo and Shelley F. Mitchell

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Foreword

In Search of a Multidisciplinary, Innovative and Integrated Approach

Mark Starik

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Business cases for sustainability-integrated management education

In Search of a Multidisciplinary, Innovative and Integrated Approach

Melissa Edwards, Suzanne Benn and Mark Starik

As the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development has now concluded, sustainability educators are reflecting on and planning next steps for embedding sustainability in higher education curriculum. Many exemplars of holistic sustainability-integrated management education (SIME) exist, and various techniques and frameworks for embedding sustainability into the curriculum have been developed. Yet business schools have been critiqued for having a dearth of sustainability in the curriculum. This raises an important question regarding how SIME can feasibly and viably thrive in management education. Taking a multilevel, multi-systems view of higher education, many interrelated factors can be attributed to influencing the position a university adopts in its approach to embedding sustainability into the curriculum. In an increasingly complex and marketized system, a business case for SIME is required. Business cases range from a reactionary ‘business as usual’ to a holistically integrated ‘business as unusual’ approach. Using a ‘phase model’ framework the authors analyze various different business cases for SIME, elaborating how varying pedagogical assumptions can lead to starkly different value propositions for SIME. The model can be applied to compare and contrast between multiple business cases and used as a means for positioning and justifying a holistic approach to SIME.