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Edited by Ada Scupola and Lars Fuglsang

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Robert D. Hisrich and Veland Ramadani

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Bart J. Bronnenberg

Retailing is an important sector of the economy: it is roughly equal in size to the manufacturing sector, and still expanding in many countries. Why do economies have such a large retail sector and what does it produce? The chapter explores this question by looking at the retail sector through the lens of household production theory. It discusses how structural changes in consumers’ time allocation impact retail strategy, and conversely, how retail innovations that make purchasing and home production more convenient impact the purchasing habits and time use of consumers. In so doing, it connects the marketing literature on retailing to the economic literatures on household economics and on time use. The chapter also provides suggestions for future research into the role of consumer time use on innovation in retailing, and vice versa.

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Edited by Katrijn Gielens and Els Gijsbrechts

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Edited by Katrijn Gielens and Els Gijsbrechts

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Hanna Leipämaa-Leskinen, Henna Syrjälä and Pirjo Laaksonen

The first chapter revisits the sin of pride in the consumer research debate. While previous scholars have conceptualized pride as an ego-focused emotion that may appear as either negative (excessive) or positive (authentic), our aim is to open up the more discreet facets of pride by taking it into the conditions of scarce consumption. Using narrative methodology, we explore how pride emerges in Finnish nonvoluntary simplifiers (poor consumers) and voluntary simplifiers’ lives. The findings complete prior discussions illuminating two narrative categories of pride in scarce conditions: “forbidden fruit” and “hidden heroism,” which together construct the third facet of pride, “silenced pride.” In conclusion, we discuss how the social and cultural frames of consumption may hinder experiences and expressions of pride.

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Victoria K. Wells, Diana Gregory-Smith and Danae Manika

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Edited by Henna Syrjälä and Hanna Leipämaa-Leskinen

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Edited by Natalie Mizik and Dominique M. Hanssens

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Angela Y. Lee and Alice M. Tybout

Marketing academics, managers, public policy makers, and litigators often ponder questions that involve relationships between alternative treatments or strategies and people’s responses. Among the variety of research approaches available to them, only experimental designs afford strong causal inferences about such relationships. The chapter reviews the nature of such experiments, discusses the role of laboratory versus field experiments and explores the design of lab experiments along various dimensions.