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Thomas Garavan, Alma McCarthy and Ronan Carbery

This chapter charts the landscape of international human resource development (IHRD) and engages with four key strands of IHRD scholarship that point to its possible boundaries. The chapter maps out a number of contextual drivers that are shaping IHRD as both an academic field of research and a set of organisational practices. The chapter proposes an overarching framework to conceptualise the terrain of IHRD. The chapter summarises the focus of the Handbook and summarises the individual chapters and how they are organised. Finally, the chapter proposes a number of priority research areas that will help to give the construct legitimacy as a field of research. The chapter engages in these debates while also acknowledging the emergent, dynamic and constantly evolving nature of the IHRD field.

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Richard Hawkins and Knut Blind

This introduction explores the conceptual background and definitions that pertain to understanding standards and standardization in the context of innovation. A general overview is provided of the themes explored in the chapters that follow.

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Preface

Creating Business Models with New Forms of Innovation​

Stephen Flowers, Martin Meyer and Jari Kuusisto

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The new frontier of innovation

Creating Business Models with New Forms of Innovation​

Stephen Flowers, Martin Meyer and Jari Kuusisto

This is an introductory chapter that outlines the main context for the book – the shift in the ability of users and others to mobilise and coordinate the resources required in order to innovate. This book provides a detailed account of the way in which goods and services are produced and consumed at the new frontier of innovation. Each of the chapters explores a different aspect of this developing frontier and provide detailed case studies of the different forms the processes of creation and consumption are now taking. This is not an exercise in prediction, rather it holds up a mirror to what is happening around us and provides a new toolkit to help make sense of complex and confusing situations. The exciting, or disturbing, reality is that the real-world cases presented throughout the book provide illustrations of possible futures for firms, sectors and entire industries.

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Marika Lüders, Tor W. Andreassen, Simon Clatworthy and Tore Hillestad

In the introductory chapter, the editors respond to the fundamental goal for any firm: to maintain and build customer trust. The overall themes of the book are innovation, trust and customer experience. The book’s title – Innovating for Trust – reflects trust as an antecedent to adoption and commercial success, as well as an outcome of adoption and commercial success. In short, managers and innovators need to build trust into all activities of innovation. The chapter starts by defining and discussing the notion of innovation. Attempts to innovate are ultimately about forecasting what the future entails, and what customers may want. Innovative capabilities consequently include creative change thinking; not as an isolated act of a genius but as acts of picking up signals of change and opportunities. Also discussed are dimensions and types of innovations, and the editors distinguish between radical and incremental innovations, on the one hand, and sustaining and disruptive innovations, on the other hand. The notion of the innovation journey as a guide for reading the book is offered, together with an overview of the main contributions of the different parts of the book.

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Søren Harnow Klausen

The chapter provides a conceptual analysis of the general notion of innovation, informed by empirical results and with an eye to practical applications. Innovation is distinguished from creativity on the one hand and entrepreneurship on the other, but defined broadly enough to comprise much more than technological inventiveness (for example social innovation). The popular two-step model of innovation processes is criticized and instead an integrated model is proposed as a superior alternative. The notions of macro- and micro-innovation are supplemented by a notion of still subtler, process-immanent improvements. Finally, the close relationship between innovation and learning is examined.

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Franco Malerba, Sunil Mani and Pamela Adams

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Eric Shiu

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Edited by Franco Malerba, Sunil Mani and Pamela Adams

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Flemming Sørensen and Francesco Lapenta

This introductory chapter of the service innovation research methods book introduces the aim and purpose of the book. It describes the theoretical framework that underpins the book and its individual chapters. The framework includes considerations about a) the theoretical and methodological dimensions of service innovation, b) contemporary trends in service innovation and research, and c) society’s expectations of service innovation research. Additionally, the chapter introduces the content of the individual chapters and thus provides an overview of the contents of the book.