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Aharon Tziner and Edna Rabenu

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Aharon Tziner and Edna Rabenu

In this introductory chapter, we examine key phrases and concepts that apply to the field of work performance, such as ‘performance’, ‘appraisal’, and ‘job evaluation’, among others. We briefly touch on the factors that contribute to an employee’s performance at work, the essential necessity of performance appraisal in the workforce, and some of the challenges and pitfalls encountered in attempting to reach objective appraisals of an employees’ respective inputs to the productivity of their organizations.

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Victoria K. Wells, Diana Gregory-Smith and Danae Manika

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Eric J. Bolland and Carlos J. Lopes

The aim of the book to learn more about successful and unsuccessful business decisions. Business decisions are consequential. Poor business decisions cause poor performance. Part of the purpose is to address the connection between business decisions and business performance. Decision making is defined in this chapter. Decision making involves risk. The chapter identifies those who make business decisions. Strategic business decisions are defined and tactical decisions are defined and differentiated. The evolution of business decisions is reviewed. The importance of exploring the book’s topic is explicated. Levels of decision making are described. Problems with decision making and performance measurement are discussed. The chapter also presents the plan for the remaining chapters.

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Constant D. Beugré

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Constant D. Beugré

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Elaine Farndale, Wolfgang Mayrhofer and Chris Brewster

The subject of comparative human resource management (HRM) and its boundaries are established, discussing the role of context in HRM. The question is then raised whether globalisation is making such an analysis increasingly irrelevant as societies seem to converge. To investigate convergence further, the chapter explores levels and units of analysis of comparative HRM. The chapter also outlines the shape and content of the Handbook, which includes theoretical and empirical issues in comparative HRM, the way that these affect particular elements of HRM, and the way that different countries and regions think about the topic.

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Constant D. Beugré

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Convenience in white-collar crime

Convenience in White-Collar Crime

Petter Gottschalk

Convenience is a concept that was theoretically mainly associated with efficiency in time savings. Today, convenience is associated with a number of other characteristics, such as reduced effort and reduced pain. Convenience is associated with terms such as fast, easy, and safe. Convenience says something about attractiveness and accessibility. A convenient individual is not necessarily bad or lazy. On the contrary, the person can be seen as smart and rational. Convenience orientation is conceptualized as the value that individuals and organizations place on actions with inherent characteristics of saving time and effort. Convenience orientation can be considered a value-like construct that influences behavior and decision-making.

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Paul Sparrow and Cary L. Cooper

The chapter summarises recent changes in the HR function. HR directors have developed strategic insight into their organisation, focusing their function on the need to look “into” the organisation, and its strategy, and help ensure the effective execution of change, as part of a team of other senior leaders. As such, they have had to evidence the contribution that people management can have to business challenges such as innovation, productivity, lean management, customer centricity, and the globalisation of operations and organisation capabilities. They have learned to understand the complexity of their organisation’s business models and the different options that exist in terms of organisation design. It notes two over-riding debates or narratives that have come to activity: the notion of talent management; forging a clear link, and line of sight, from the strategy and the changes in business model this often entails, and the engagement of the workforce. The chapter signals the re-emergence of a range of societal debates. It organises the future HRM research agenda into four topics: the role of HR strategy, structure and architecture; the role of key HR processes; key performance enablers and key performance outcomes.