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Edited by Dirk Lindebaum, Deanna Geddes and Peter J. Jordan

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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

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Aharon Tziner and Edna Rabenu

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Aharon Tziner and Edna Rabenu

In this introductory chapter, we examine key phrases and concepts that apply to the field of work performance, such as ‘performance’, ‘appraisal’, and ‘job evaluation’, among others. We briefly touch on the factors that contribute to an employee’s performance at work, the essential necessity of performance appraisal in the workforce, and some of the challenges and pitfalls encountered in attempting to reach objective appraisals of an employees’ respective inputs to the productivity of their organizations.

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Victoria K. Wells, Diana Gregory-Smith and Danae Manika

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Eric J. Bolland and Carlos J. Lopes

The aim of the book to learn more about successful and unsuccessful business decisions. Business decisions are consequential. Poor business decisions cause poor performance. Part of the purpose is to address the connection between business decisions and business performance. Decision making is defined in this chapter. Decision making involves risk. The chapter identifies those who make business decisions. Strategic business decisions are defined and tactical decisions are defined and differentiated. The evolution of business decisions is reviewed. The importance of exploring the book’s topic is explicated. Levels of decision making are described. Problems with decision making and performance measurement are discussed. The chapter also presents the plan for the remaining chapters.

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Constant D. Beugré

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Constant D. Beugré

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Elaine Farndale, Wolfgang Mayrhofer and Chris Brewster

The subject of comparative human resource management (HRM) and its boundaries are established, discussing the role of context in HRM. The question is then raised whether globalisation is making such an analysis increasingly irrelevant as societies seem to converge. To investigate convergence further, the chapter explores levels and units of analysis of comparative HRM. The chapter also outlines the shape and content of the Handbook, which includes theoretical and empirical issues in comparative HRM, the way that these affect particular elements of HRM, and the way that different countries and regions think about the topic.