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Geoffrey Jones

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Sharon Alvarez, Elias G. Carayannis, Giovanni Battista Dagnino and Rosario Faraci

In the introductory chapter, the authors spell out the contributions that the book advances to the emerging debate on entrepreneurial ecosystems and the diffusion of startups, and illustrate the reasons that led them to gather nine relevant conceptual and empirical contributions written by 21 leading scholars from various parts of the world in the field of entrepreneurship and strategy. They define the target audience of the book as entrepreneurship and strategy students, academics and a wide array of practitioners, such as entrepreneurs, executives, consultants and policy makers. The structure of the book is outlined and an overview of the chapters provided.

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Edited by Elias G. Carayannis, Giovanni B. Dagnino, Sharon Alvarez and Rosario Faraci

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Eric J. Bolland and Carlos J. Lopes

The aim of the book to learn more about successful and unsuccessful business decisions. Business decisions are consequential. Poor business decisions cause poor performance. Part of the purpose is to address the connection between business decisions and business performance. Decision making is defined in this chapter. Decision making involves risk. The chapter identifies those who make business decisions. Strategic business decisions are defined and tactical decisions are defined and differentiated. The evolution of business decisions is reviewed. The importance of exploring the book’s topic is explicated. Levels of decision making are described. Problems with decision making and performance measurement are discussed. The chapter also presents the plan for the remaining chapters.

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Israel Drori and Mike Wright

In this chapter, the editors, Mike Wright and Israel Drori, describe the variety of structures, processes and outcomes characterizing accelerators, based on their field research in accelerators across Europe, Israel and the US, and follow with an overview of the book, concluding with a summary of how accelerators are the building blocks of the new economy’s innovative ecosystems.

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Mitsuru Kodama

Strategic innovation dynamically brings about strategic positioning through new products, services and business models, and is a dynamic view of strategy that enables a large corporation to maintain its competitiveness and establish sustainable growth. For these reasons, large corporations have to be innovators that can reinforce their existing positions (businesses) through incremental innovation, while at the same time constantly renew or destroy existing business through radical innovation. From detailed reviews of existing capabilities theories (resource-based theory of the firm, dynamic capabilities, and so on), and further theories deeply related to the characteristics of corporate or organizational capabilities and field data on sustainable growth of global corporations, this chapter presents the concept of a “Capabilities Map” derived from existing research into the characteristics of dynamic capabilities responding to environmental conditions such as dynamic temporal shifts and factors of uncertainly.

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Preface and acknowledgments

Driving Congruence in Capabilities

Mitsuru Kodama

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The management of natural resources: an overview and research agenda

Organizational Strategy, Behaviour and Dynamics

Gerard George, Simon J.D. Schillebeeckx and Teng Lit Liak

This chapter is a reprint from an editorial in the Academy of Management Journal. The article investigates how resources have been discussed and theorized over the last decades and finds that despite their omnipresence in economics, engineering and policy, managerial thought on natural resources is largely missing. Yet, important questions on how firms deal with scarcity of natural resources, how they are managed in a sustainable way, and how they inspire all kinds of organizational action abound. We discuss organizational, institutional and societal responses to scarcity and present ways to continue research on the ‘Grand Challenge’ of natural resources within the field of management. Finally, we present a conversation with Teng Lit Liak, a businessman, politician and environmental champion in Singapore on his perspectives on the natural environment.

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Introduction: developing thought leadership on managing natural resources

Organizational Strategy, Behaviour and Dynamics

Edited by Gerard George and Simon J.D. Schillebeeckx

The book aims to develop thought leadership on managing natural resources and stimulate the emergence of a community of management scholars that will advance research in this exciting area. We invited scholars from around the world to share conceptual and empirical research in which natural resources take centre stage and present 11 chapters that all contribute in important ways to both management theory and thinking as well as to the natural resource agenda. We explicitly draw the connection between the sustainable development goals of the United Nations and natural resources and explore how the chapters in this book address many of these goals in a way that husbands management theory with real impact.

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Xavier Castañer and Howard Yu

This chapter takes issue with what the authors identify as a tendency in the literature to overestimate middle managers’ strategic role, and perhaps more importantly, to underestimate top managers’ role in emergent strategy and the development of strategic initiatives. The authors argue that the Bower_Burgelman model – originally developed as descriptive theory – has been overinterpreted as a normative model. The result is a view of top managers’ role as process architect rather than active participant in emergent processes. These scholars argue that there are circumstances requiring a more substantive role. Crucial to understanding this claim, the authors observe that the unit of analysis – who is a middle and who is a top manager – depends on what level of strategy making constitutes the research focus. The chapter takes a contingent view and identifies four conditions requiring direction from top management in emergent processes.