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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

When reviewing the promotional materials of most colleges and universities in the United States, we are hard pressed to find any without the use of the word “leader” or “leadership.” Yet, when we delve deeper into their catalogues and websites, the numbers dwindle. Teaching leadership goes beyond mission statements in which leadership is articulated. This chapter reviews the evolution of teaching leadership and its place in higher education. We approach the teaching of leadership as having three conceptual approaches – as an intellectual enterprise (the study of leadership), a focus on competency-building (leadership training), and the promotion of leadership development. We frame the teaching of leadership through four levels of analysis – individual, team/community, organizational, and global. At the end of the chapter, we combine these two perspectives (the three conceptual approaches and the four levels of analysis) to create an overarching map of the different topics that are used in the teaching of leadership.

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Brent Edwin Cusher and Mark A. Menaldo

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Kristin M.S. Bezio

This chapter addresses Christopher Marlowe, whose influence over his own time was significant, as he was one of the first playwrights to develop the dramatic formula we have come to associate with the now more-famous Shakespeare. In the years since his death in 1593, Marlowe has become an icon of early atheism and heresy, as well as resistance to an authoritarian government. In addition to his impact on the dramatic genre, Marlowe’s work, particularly Massacre at Paris, shows disdain for the violence that seemed to him endemic to the English Reformation, and suggests a nihilistic view of religion as detrimental to society.

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Birgit Schyns, Pedro Neves and Rosalie J. Hall

This volume provides an overview of a variety of established and newer methods for leadership research. It is intended for any individuals wanting to undertake research on leadership, whether they are academics or practitioners, undergraduates, graduate students working on a dissertation, or new or established professionals. It will be particularly useful for academics who want to try a new method and graduate students working on a dissertation who want an overview of what is out there. This book covers quantitative as well as qualitative methods but with a stronger focus on the former than the latter. Included are chapters focusing on measurement and design as well as analytical methods. All chapters outline a method and provide examples of how to apply the method to leadership research. It concludes with an overview of the future of leadership research.

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Steve Kempster, Arthur F. Turner and Gareth Edwards

In this opening chapter we seek to address three purposes. First we outline the focus of the field guide book – experiential learning. Experiential learning in leadership development has been dominated by outdoor (and indoor) activities such as the spiders’ web. However, the ability of such activities to capture the complexity of leadership practice is rather restricted. We explore this point and suggest there is much need for alternative experiential processes that are more suited to the development of leadership practice. Second we outline the chapters of the book that provide a spectrum of approaches that have been developed and tested in the ‘field’ of leadership development. All of the approaches are fundamentally aligned to advancing leadership practice through reflection. Third the chapter seeks to illustrate a style of writing that is commensurate with a field guide. We seek to be direct and engaging; rooted in theoretical arguments yet accessible and connected to everyday practice; provocative and reflexive. The chapter concludes by arguing for reflection and practice to become an essential part of organizational leadership. To that end we offer up the notion of the ‘leadership practice field’ and pose the question ‘how can we enable those who lead to practise leading’.

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Edited by Peter Iver Kaufman and Kristin M.S. Bezio