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Michael L. Barnett

Oh, I hear you: ‘Barnett, what are you trying to pull here? Isn’t this just a collection of reprints?’ Sure, the bulk of the book consists of reprints. But if you’ll allow me to explain, there’s much more to it than that. And besides, there’s merit in reprints. In this book, I put forth a critical view of the business case for corporate social responsibility.

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Geoffrey Jones

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Edited by Sabri Boubaker, Douglas Cumming and Duc K. Nguyen

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Joseph R. Mason

While some have bemoaned CO2 markets’ performance due to low prices – that is, too low to deter emissions – a potentially bigger threat is that such markets develop to provide binding constraints arising not from market pricing but from non-fundamental factors like fraud and rent-seeking. Investor fraud, corporate fraud, and counterfeiting and theft are already well-known to these markets, with little in the way of specific oversight and protection. If we are to expect meaningful market development, it makes sense to insulate such markets rent-seeking, generally, including various forms of fraud, counterfeiting, and permit theft that have already manifested in the sector. Only by restraining such influences can we provide a smooth-functioning CO2 market that can be the basis of economic growth, without exposing the broader economy to the potential for commodity market panics and crashes.

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Edited by Sabri Boubaker, Douglas Cumming and Duc K. Nguyen

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Victoria K. Wells, Diana Gregory-Smith and Danae Manika

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Edited by Sabri Boubaker, Douglas Cumming and Duc K. Nguyen

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Shawn Pope

Theorists have given strategic and political reasons to expect a relationship from advertising to CSR. Contrary to these expectations, the nearly 30 studies that have tested the relationship from advertising to CSR have yielded evidence that is surprisingly weak. The chapter systematically reviews this literature and conducts its own international panel study. The present findings also suggest the absence of a strong, robust link from advertising to CSR. In a concluding section, this chapter discusses the findings in light of other recent studies of CSR advertising and of CSR adoption motivations.

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Sabri Boubaker, Douglas Cumming and Duc Khuong Nguyen

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General introduction

Perspectives for Sustainable Corporate Governance

Catherine Malecki