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Young-Myon Lee and Bruce E. Kaufman

In order to contextualize Korean employment and industrial relations (EIR) in the field of EIR thought, a field largely dominated by Western ideas and experience, this chapter breaks down Korean EIR into its component parts using two particular frameworks: a union/labor management model and an employment relationship model. This structured approach brings to the fore often overlooked facts regarding Korean institutions, collective actors, socio-economic and political forces that have shaped its employment relations and industrial environment – namely, the preponderance of small to medium-sized enterprises, the highly politicized evolution of unions and employer associations and their connection to the besieged and suffering ‘haan’ mentality, the movement away from Confucian-system paternal relations and the preference for strong, centralized leadership. The chapter highlights key events that have driven a narrow labor/management bias in Korean EIR, especially the Great Labor Offensive, and examines the whole through Kaufman’s employment relations model.

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Aharon Tziner and Edna Rabenu

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Hanna Leipämaa-Leskinen, Henna Syrjälä and Pirjo Laaksonen

The first chapter revisits the sin of pride in the consumer research debate. While previous scholars have conceptualized pride as an ego-focused emotion that may appear as either negative (excessive) or positive (authentic), our aim is to open up the more discreet facets of pride by taking it into the conditions of scarce consumption. Using narrative methodology, we explore how pride emerges in Finnish nonvoluntary simplifiers (poor consumers) and voluntary simplifiers’ lives. The findings complete prior discussions illuminating two narrative categories of pride in scarce conditions: “forbidden fruit” and “hidden heroism,” which together construct the third facet of pride, “silenced pride.” In conclusion, we discuss how the social and cultural frames of consumption may hinder experiences and expressions of pride.

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Aharon Tziner and Edna Rabenu

In this introductory chapter, we examine key phrases and concepts that apply to the field of work performance, such as ‘performance’, ‘appraisal’, and ‘job evaluation’, among others. We briefly touch on the factors that contribute to an employee’s performance at work, the essential necessity of performance appraisal in the workforce, and some of the challenges and pitfalls encountered in attempting to reach objective appraisals of an employees’ respective inputs to the productivity of their organizations.

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Victoria K. Wells, Diana Gregory-Smith and Danae Manika

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Tuomo Peltonen, Hugo Gaggiotti and Peter Case

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Sharon Alvarez, Elias G. Carayannis, Giovanni Battista Dagnino and Rosario Faraci

In the introductory chapter, the authors spell out the contributions that the book advances to the emerging debate on entrepreneurial ecosystems and the diffusion of startups, and illustrate the reasons that led them to gather nine relevant conceptual and empirical contributions written by 21 leading scholars from various parts of the world in the field of entrepreneurship and strategy. They define the target audience of the book as entrepreneurship and strategy students, academics and a wide array of practitioners, such as entrepreneurs, executives, consultants and policy makers. The structure of the book is outlined and an overview of the chapters provided.

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Alain Fayolle

Considering the current state of knowledge in entrepreneurship education, we call for a pragmatic and critical approach in the development of future perspectives on entrepreneurship education research. We highlight the need to develop research focusing on the three main dimensions: target, connect and reflect. Target refers to building theoretical foundations. Connect and reflect refer to bridging disciplines and communities (research and practice) and increasing the critical thinking perspective respectively. In this line of thoughts, this chapter presents the different contributions of the Research Agenda in Entrepreneurship Education book. This collective work is an attempt to promote innovative and to a certain extent provocative contributions aiming at producing knowledge on the three dimensions above. Our intention is to bring a significant value to entrepreneurship education researchers, policy-makers and practitioners.

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Edited by Henna Syrjälä and Hanna Leipämaa-Leskinen