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Michael H. Morris, Susana C. Santos and Xaver Neumeyer

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Chris Steyaert and Pascal Dey

In the opening chapter, we explain the importance of engaging critically with social entrepreneurship. We underline the need to make an incisive assessment of social entrepreneurship through the way we (still) publish, critique and imagine books in this field. To all those who want to embark on the path of social entrepreneurship, or are simply curious to hear more about the buzz surrounding social entrepreneurship, we say be aware: we need critique, and we need it now! The affirmative critiques we offer to social entrepreneurship are not based on a priori judgements of social entrepreneurship performed from afar, but are intimately related to specific, phenomenological events and observations. Furthermore, we recapitulate how this book draws upon and intervenes in the critical reception of social entrepreneurship. The chapter ends with an overview of the various chapters and the various critical perspectives and themes they draw on and address.

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Edited by Laura J. Spence, Jedrzej G. Frynas, Judy N. Muthuri and Jyoti Navare

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Laura J. Spence, Jedrzej George Frynas, Judy N. Muthuri and Jyoti Navare

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Yuko Aoyama and Balaji Parthasarathy

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Edited by Jeremi Brewer and Stephen W. Gibson

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Edited by Jeremi Brewer and Stephen W. Gibson

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Jeremi Brewer

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Melvin Haas and Peter Vogel

Governments around the world are facing increasing pressure to reduce unemployment. According to the International Labor Organization (ILO), a deficit of 50 million jobs as compared to the pre-crisis situation is causing significant pressure on policymakers, particularly as this deficit disproportionately affects youth. One central strategy in addressing unemployment is to directly support unemployed individuals equipped with a business idea in starting their own company. For this purpose, several active labor market programs (ALMPs) have been developed, providing support to those seeking to start a business after a period of unemployment. This chapter provides an overview and analysis of such policy schemes from 12 European countries. The selection of countries seeks to reflect the diversity with regards to economic importance, political orientation, history and culture, as well as the variety of program structures that have been implemented. Similarities and differences between these programs are analyzed in order to contribute to increasing their effectiveness (for example, pointing out suitable policy instruments) and their efficiency (for example, by employing limited public funds with maximum.
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Rafael Ziegler, Lena Partzsch, Jana Gebauer, Marianne Henkel, Franziska Mohaupt and Justus Lodemann