Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 46 items :

  • Economics of Entrepreneurship x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

References

Entrepreneurship, Growth and Development in Uncertain Times

Edited by Nick Williams and Tim Vorley

This content is available to you

Introduction

Entrepreneurship, Growth and Development in Uncertain Times

Nick Williams and Tim Vorley

This content is available to you

Foreword

Entrepreneurship, Growth and Development in Uncertain Times

Edited by Nick Williams and Tim Vorley

This content is available to you

Hans Landström and Colin Mason

This content is available to you

Daniel Silander and Charlotte Silander

Using social science and economics perspectives, the goal of this study is to complement the dominant business administration research on entrepreneurship by increasing our knowledge about the economic-political context in which entrepreneurship and private enterprise are conducted. This book explores the role of political entrepreneurs for regional growth and entrepreneurial diversity in Sweden. We define a political entrepreneur as a politician/bureaucrat/officer/department within the publicly funded sector who with innovative approaches encourages entrepreneurship/business and where the goals are growth, employment and the common good. The approach of this book is to enrich the established research on entrepreneurship with in-depth knowledge of the conditions for entrepreneurship in Sweden. The main focus of study is the role that the political entrepreneur might play in promoting entrepreneurship, enterprise and entrepreneurial diversity in the Swedish economy.
This content is available to you

Arnis Sauka, Friedrich Schneider and Colin C. Williams

This content is available to you

José Ernesto Amor—s, Juan Pablo Couyoumdjian, Oscar Cristi and Maria Minniti

The informal sector is usually perceived as a negative feature of an economy since greater informality tends to translate into lower productivity. Nevertheless, informality may be the rational answer to contextual constraints. Thus, given the entrepreneurial nature of the informal sector, we argue that, in an environment with weak institutions, participation in informal activity may be beneficial at both the individual and aggregate levels. Using country-level data we provide evidence of a positive relationship between informal entrepreneurial activity and economic development. Our results suggest that, in countries with weak institutions, informal entrepreneurship is a viable and constructive substitute for the formal sector and is conducive to improvements in living standards.
This content is available to you

Edited by Arnis Sauka, Friedrich Schneider and Colin C. Williams

This content is available to you

Zoltán J. Ács

This content is available to you

Sameeksah Desai, Zoltán J. Ács and Utz Weitzel