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The State, Business and Education

Public-Private Partnerships Revisited

Edited by Gita Steiner-Khamsi and Alexandra Draxler

The State, Business and Education contributes to the ongoing debates surrounding the effects of public funding of private entities by examining the ways in which they affect the quality and equity of those services, and the realization of human rights. Using case studies from both the developing and developed world this book illustrates the variety of ways in which private actors have expanded their involvement in education as a business.
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Edited by Gita Steiner-Khamsi and Alexandra Draxler

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Edited by Scott Farrow

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William K. Bellinger

How much to invest is a fundamental question applying equally well to socially valued public investments as to the private sector. Benefit-cost analysis is the cornerstone of the economic analysis of public policy, and is closely aligned with basic rational choice and market concepts from microeconomics. Information and other constraints often block the direct application of marginal analysis in policy decisions, but the conceptual role of marginalism can still be useful in interpreting cost-benefit analysis. While all policy analysis texts that emphasize the economic dimensions of policy cover the basics of marginal analysis, the sources of market inefficiency, and basic decision rules for policy analysis, the connections between marginal analysis and non-marginal policy decision rules are seldom emphasized. This chapter limits its discussion of marginal analysis to the concepts of optimal quantity and optimal allocation rather than the market based concepts of surplus, equilibrium and elasticity, which are discussed in later chapters. This chapter begins by reviewing marginal and non-marginal concepts and measures for policymaking, and then discusses a set of basic policy decisions that can be informed by these concepts. Student exercises are included and answered in the appendix to the chapter.

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Fiscal decentralization 101

Development from Below

Roy Bahl and Richard M. Bird

Fiscal decentralization is about how central governments empower subnational governments to service their populations and to pay for these services. This chapter provides an introductory overview of the main arguments of the book. We discuss why fiscal decentralization is often part of a country’s development policy, as well as the risks involved in giving local and regional governments more fiscal discretion. Here and throughout the book the discussion is based on theoretical arguments; our reading of the by now extensive research findings on many aspects of these issues; and our many years of observing how middle- and lower-income countries in all regions of the world operate. We conclude that while a few developing countries have turned theory into practice with good results, most have been proved unable to reap the potential benefits in practice so that, on balance, there is not much evidence of effective fiscal decentralization on the ground in most countries.

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Edited by Massimo Florio

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Massimo Florio

Some regulatory reforms cannot be simply described by the change of a microeconomic signal, or macroeconomic instrument, leading to a specific marginal effect on social welfare. Rather, they should be represented by packages shifting a policy framework. The aim of this chapter is to discuss the theoretical foundations of the evaluation of policy framework reforms in network industries. Some potential interpretational pitfalls are identified and some guidance on carrying out econometric analyses is provided. Since the use of categorical variables has become widespread in the empirical evaluation of such reforms, methodological issues and conceptual errors that might be introduced when building numerical proxies of reforms are discussed. Some of these issues are key for the correct assessment of reforms and hence for formulating coherent policy recommendations.

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Benton E. Gup

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Edited by Benton E. Gup

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Christoph Scherrer