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Bridget M. Hutter

This chapter outlines some of the most prominent environmental issues we face, including changes in our understandings of environmental risks, uncertainties and damage and the inequalities attaching to them. It discusses strategies for managing these risks, focusing in particular on risk and resilience perspectives and the ways in which they relate to environmental law. The chapter introduces the organisation of the book around major themes such as variable perspectives on risk regulation; the compatibility of law with notions of risk and resilience; transnational efforts to manage environmental risks; and the difficulties associated with managing inequalities within and between countries. It concludes with an introduction to some of the emerging governance issues generated by these debates.

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Edited by Bridget M. Hutter

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Richard D. Margerum and Cathy J. Robinson

Collaborative approaches to governance have been initiated to address some of the most complex and difficult problems facing society today. This chapter reviews the principles and concepts embodying collaboration and its evolution from a range of disciplines. It reviews the emergence of collaboration in the United States, Europe and globally. It explores the concept of collaboration and its principles across a diversity of disciplines, including urban planning, public administration, public policy, political science, conflict resolution and other fields. The authors unpack the concepts of challenges faced by collaboration and the extent to which these represent limitations or shortcomings of theory and practice. They also examine the concept of governance and its changing nature in relation to decision making, participants in this decision making and the role of government. The chapter concludes with an overview of each chapter in the book and its contributions to (1) theory and context, (2) problems and context, (3) policy politics and power, (4) organizations, stakeholders and governance, and (5) process and participation.
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Edited by Susan C. Breau and Katja L.H. Samuel

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Edited by Susan C. Breau and Katja L.H. Samuel

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Edited by Susan C. Breau and Katja L.H. Samuel

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Susan C. Breau and Katja L. H. Samuel

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Edited by Susan C. Breau and Katja L.H. Samuel

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Colin T. Reid and Walters Nsoh

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Colin T. Reid and Walters Nsoh

Globally we are failing to halt the loss of biodiversity while at the same time coming to realise the many ways in which the natural world provides us with a range of very valuable ecosystem services. Traditional laws of property have given little recognition to nature and we have largely resorted to ‘command and control’ techniques when trying to regulate our impact on biodiversity (e.g. designating protected sites and species). Across environmental regulation, however, there is growing interest in and use of other, market-based techniques, such as trading and offset schemes, as a means of addressing environmental problems. Such an approach might be applied in relation to biodiversity as well. There are, however, challenges in doing so and some critics would argue that this would amount to an unacceptable commodification of nature. The remaining chapters of this book examine pervasive issues affecting the use of a market-based approach for biodiversity conservation, explore the key legal mechanisms that might be employed, consider the challenges in designing effective and efficient schemes and reflect on some of the ethical debates on their use.