Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 764 items :

  • Environmental Law x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Table of legislation

Bulk Fresh Water, Irrigation Subsidies and Virtual Water

Fitzgerald Temmerman

This content is available to you

Table of cases

Bulk Fresh Water, Irrigation Subsidies and Virtual Water

Fitzgerald Temmerman

This content is available to you

Bridget M. Hutter

This chapter outlines some of the most prominent environmental issues we face, including changes in our understandings of environmental risks, uncertainties and damage and the inequalities attaching to them. It discusses strategies for managing these risks, focusing in particular on risk and resilience perspectives and the ways in which they relate to environmental law. The chapter introduces the organisation of the book around major themes such as variable perspectives on risk regulation; the compatibility of law with notions of risk and resilience; transnational efforts to manage environmental risks; and the difficulties associated with managing inequalities within and between countries. It concludes with an introduction to some of the emerging governance issues generated by these debates.

This content is available to you

Edited by Bridget M. Hutter

This content is available to you

Introduction

Bulk Fresh Water, Irrigation Subsidies and Virtual Water

Fitzgerald Temmerman

This content is available to you

Foreword

Bulk Fresh Water, Irrigation Subsidies and Virtual Water

Fitzgerald Temmerman

This content is available to you

Bulk fresh water resources and the GATT

Bulk Fresh Water, Irrigation Subsidies and Virtual Water

Fitzgerald Temmerman

In the near future, climate change and global warming could trigger international trade in (bulk) fresh water on a far larger scale then is presently already the case. In this context, the question whether bulk fresh water is to be considered as a ‘good’ or a ‘product’, falling under the ambit of the GATT, is highly controversial. In fact, no decisive legal arguments against such an inclusion currently exist. Therefore, as a precautionary measure, legal scholars advocate formally excluding bulk fresh water from falling under the ambit of the GATT. Could such a scenario, if not utopian, effectively hinder international trade in bulk fresh water from developing, once the need is there? Excluding bulk fresh water from the ambit of the GATT is perhaps not to be considered as particularly compelling, since the WTO framework potentially offers sufficient leeway to effectively take into account non-trade concerns, such as environmental rights and the right to water. KEYWORDS: Climate change – global warming – water – trade – WTO – GATT

This content is available to you

Leonie Reins

This chapter provides an overall introduction to the volume. More precisely it describes the research agenda for the chapters to come, the overall challenges to a coherent regulation of shale gas, the associated environmental impacts, as well as the overarching research questions and overall structure. Key words: research agenda; environmental impacts; shale gas; coherent regulation

This content is available to you

Edited by Michael Faure

This content is available to you

Mary Jane Angelo

This chapter serves as an introduction to the issues associated with agriculture and climate change and provides context for the other chapters in the volume. It describes how, although a wide range of ideas and perspectives are presented in the volume, several common themes emerge. Climate change and agriculture are part of a complex web of science, law and policy, which extends from the global scale to the smallholder. Agriculture is a significant contributor to climate change and thus should be considered part of the solution, as well as part of the problem. Consequently changes to agricultural systems that reduce GHG emissions, sequester carbon or put land to use in ways that reduce overall atmospheric carbon can be important tools for climate change mitigation. Conversely agriculture in general and food security in particular, will suffer serious adverse impacts from climate change even with mitigation measures in place. Accordingly agricultural adaptation strategies targeted at agricultural production will be critical to ensuring food security in the future. Because of the pervasive complexity and uncertainty regarding climate change impacts on agriculture, it will be important to ensure that any adaptation efforts employ systems approaches aimed at building resiliency in agricultural production as well as in the entire agricultural value chain. In many cases resilient agricultural systems are comprised of both mitigation and adaptive elements. Thus building more resilient systems will have benefits in reducing the adverse effects of climate change as well as adapting to the inevitable effects that will occur. Although climate change will result in adverse impacts throughout the globe, disproportionate impacts will be felt by the poorest and most vulnerable populations. Regions of the developing world face the greatest threats to food security. Mitigation and adaptation strategies, including regulatory and financial policies must include measures to ensure greater food security for poor and vulnerable populations. This volume provides a number of proposals for climate change mitigation and adaptation aimed at providing food security for a growing population in an era of dramatic changes to the global environment. Key Words: food security, climate change, agriculture, resilience, adaptation, mitigation