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Marina van Geenhuizen, J. Adam Holbrook and Mozhdeh Taheri

This chapter presents the theme, theoretical approaches and overview of the chapters in the book. The theme is the contribution of cities (their actors) to increased sustainability in social-technical systems, eventually by accelerating sustainability improvements. The selected systems are energy, transport and healthcare. Cities may act as the cradle of key inventions, as places of up-scaling and commercialization and as places of quick adoption, though few individual cities take up all these roles. Next, several urban innovation theories are introduced, including agglomeration and cluster theories, and the relational (collaboration) approach, with the aim to ‘position’ the chapters. Specific attention is given to the entrepreneurial ecosystem approach. Complementary approaches are institutional and governance perspectives, in particular with respect to cities acting as institutional innovators. A final approach is the evolutionary approach, as invention, up-scaling, commercialization and adoption of new technology are concerned with long time-lines and manifold uncertainties.

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Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory

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Patrizio Bianchi and Sandrine Labory

This introductory chapter to the book reviews global trends in markets, focusing on globalisation and digitalisation. It is argued that the global economy seems to have entered a new phase after the financial crisis, whereby flows of goods no longer exponentially rise while data flows boom. This new phase can therefore be called ‘digital globalisation’, spurred by the fourth industrial revolution, the meaning and implications this book aims at analysing, especially regarding industry and industrial policy.

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Shin-yi Peng, Han-Wei Liu and Ching-Fu Lin

This chapter will explore the interplay between law and technology, focusing on the pertinent trade issues within megaregionals. As globalization has created markets that cross borders, there is an increasing reliance on diverse types of international legal instruments to govern science and technology. The reality is that the differences in regulatory regimes become more significant as trade obstacles. Manufacturers or service suppliers often confront challenges when attempting to comply with diverse national regulatory measures. At the forefront, the questions to ask are whether the emergence of various bilateral or megaregionals help promote regulatory cooperation/coherence? Or, has such phenomenon raised more questions than it has answered in terms of regulatory divergence? What mechanisms do the multilateral, plurilateral, or bilateral economic integration arrangements design to reduce regulatory divergence? We will engage in a critical review on pertinent law-making and jurisprudence to offer a systematic examination on regulatory convergence of technology law.

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Why is imitation not innovation?

Alternative Approaches to the Pro-Innovation Bias

Benoît Godin

Innovation theorists relegate to non-existence a series of concepts outside the semantic field of innovation. Such is the case of imitation. The chapter looks at when, how and why imitation, as an early meaning of innovation, was removed from the discourses on innovation. The chapter suggests that cultural values, disciplinary work, market ideology and semantics are key factors in explaining the neglect of imitation in discourses on innovation, particularly theories.

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Introduction: innovation – from the forbidden to a cliché

Alternative Approaches to the Pro-Innovation Bias

Benoît Godin and Dominique Vinck

The study of innovation became voluminous with a lot of theories, models, frameworks, narratives and handbooks but still reflect an innovation bias. The theorists contribute to the construction of a dominant representation of innovation, an ideology, as technological and industrial, and as a good for the economy and the society. Little attention is paid to the non-innovators. Starting with the question ‘what has been left out?’, this book suggests a change of approach. It examines innovation from a different perspective, dealing with phenomena rarely taken seriously by scholars of innovation: resistance to innovation, non-adoption, sluggishness of innovators, imitation, non-users, failure, outlaw innovation, unintended consequences, maintenance of (existing) innovation, non-innovators, de-adoption, slow innovation, innovation fads, re-shaping and adaptation of the innovation, rationale for not innovating, the social and political nature of innovation and so on. The purpose of this book is to assemble studies on these phenomena and to examine them under the umbrella of NOvation.

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Andrej Savin

This chapter is an introduction to Internet regulation in the EU. It explains how Internet architecture influences its regulation and how regulation, in turn, can have an impact on the architecture. Policy, governance, competence to regulate and various regulatory circles (e-commerce, telecoms, audio-video media services) are covered. Internet law, Cyberlaw, Internet governance, Internet policy, telecommunications law

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Barney Warf

This chapter offers an overview of technology, rebuts the common myth of technological determinism and summarizes each of the forthcoming chapters.

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Michael R. Baye and John Morgan