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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

When reviewing the promotional materials of most colleges and universities in the United States, we are hard pressed to find any without the use of the word “leader” or “leadership.” Yet, when we delve deeper into their catalogues and websites, the numbers dwindle. Teaching leadership goes beyond mission statements in which leadership is articulated. This chapter reviews the evolution of teaching leadership and its place in higher education. We approach the teaching of leadership as having three conceptual approaches – as an intellectual enterprise (the study of leadership), a focus on competency-building (leadership training), and the promotion of leadership development. We frame the teaching of leadership through four levels of analysis – individual, team/community, organizational, and global. At the end of the chapter, we combine these two perspectives (the three conceptual approaches and the four levels of analysis) to create an overarching map of the different topics that are used in the teaching of leadership.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Brent Edwin Cusher and Mark A. Menaldo

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Edited by Julian M. Hayter and George R. Goethals

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Kristin M.S. Bezio

This chapter addresses Christopher Marlowe, whose influence over his own time was significant, as he was one of the first playwrights to develop the dramatic formula we have come to associate with the now more-famous Shakespeare. In the years since his death in 1593, Marlowe has become an icon of early atheism and heresy, as well as resistance to an authoritarian government. In addition to his impact on the dramatic genre, Marlowe’s work, particularly Massacre at Paris, shows disdain for the violence that seemed to him endemic to the English Reformation, and suggests a nihilistic view of religion as detrimental to society.

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Julian Maxwell Hayter

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Steven Fein

Chapter 1 opens the volume with a social psychology perspective from Steven Fein, addressing what racism is and its continued impact on American life. The chapter begins by examining the definitions and levels of racism in the United States. Fein then moves to examining manifestations of implicit racism and modern discrimination, as well as their underlying causes. The chapter closes by considering different approaches that have been suggested for combating stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination.