Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 153 items :

  • Law - Academic x
  • Constitutional and Administrative Law x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Sara Valaguzza and Eduardo Parisi

This content is available to you

Sara Valaguzza and Eduardo Parisi

This content is available to you

Edited by Herwig C.H. Hofmann, Katerina Pantazatou and Giovanni Zaccaroni

This content is available to you

Merijn Chamon, Herwig C.H. Hofmann and Ellen Vos

More than 40 years experience with the EU decentralized agencies has made clear that the agencies are part and parcel of the EU’s institutional structure. These agencies can broadly be defined as bodies governed by European public law that are institutionally separate from the EU institutions, have their own legal personality, enjoy a certain degree of administrative and financial autonomy, and have clearly specified tasks. ‘Agencification’ of EU executive governance has thus become a fundamental feature of the EU’s institutional structure. Today there are around 40 EU decentralized agencies, which assist in the implementation of EU law and policy, provide scientific advice for both legislation and implementation, collect information, provide specific services, adopt binding acts and fulfil central roles in the coordination of national authorities. Agencies are part of a process of functional decentralization within the EU executive and operate in various policy fields, such as food and air safety, medicines, environment, telecommunications, disease prevention, border control, trademarks and banking, to name just a few.

This content is available to you

Ciara Torres-Spelliscy

This content is available to you

Ciara Torres-Spelliscy

This content is available to you

Edited by Gabriele Abels and Jan Battke

This content is available to you

Richard Albert, Antonia Baraggia and Cristina Fasone

Bicameralism is under pressure in every corner of the world. From North to South America, from Australia to Africa, and from Asia to Europe, there are some signs of success, yet perhaps more of failure, in efforts to reform bicam¬eralism to respond to the modern expectations of democracy.

This content is available to you

Dragoljub Popović

This content is available to you

Edited by Richard Albert, Antonia Baraggia and Cristina Fasone