Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 68 items :

  • Management and Universities x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Ágnes Kövér and Gaby Franger

This content is available to you

Annika Zorn, Jeff Haywood and Jean-Michel Glachant

The introduction discusses how the digital trend that has substantially disrupted other sectors is transforming the higher education sector or even posing a threat to academic institutions’ core business. What could be the rationale for higher education institutions to incorporate a comprehensive digital agenda into their core strategy? Outlining the main developments over the past years in the areas of education, research and knowledge sharing, the authors argue that academic institutions are still far from grasping the full potential of what the digital offers to the academy. Not only does the adoption of online and open practices allow universities to respond to major challenges facing them today, but a digital vision also allows higher education institutions to re-define their role in society. Subsequently, the authors outline how the examples discussed in the book, stemming from a variety of academic contexts, will enrich our understanding of what ‘moving online’ might entail and how to make it work in practice.

This content is available to you

Edited by David B. Audretsch and Albert N. Link

This content is available to you

David B. Audretsch and Albert N. Link

This content is available to you

Albert N. Link and John T. Scott

The paper is an exploratory study of science parks in the United States. It models the history of science parks as the diffusion of an innovation that was adopted at a rapid and increasing rate in the early 1980s, and since then at a decreased rate.

This content is available to you

Richard Philip Winter

Chapter 1 portrays managing as a sensemaking process and assumes academic-managers will exercise some degree of choice in choosing perspectives of managing that best fit their social worlds and their own personal beliefs, values and goal intentions. A process of sensemaking lets managers see how their thinking may be associated with certain working relationships and scholarship outcomes within HEI and their wider communities. Keywords: sensemaking; ideologies; values; emotions; goal intentions; role expectations
This content is available to you

Ulla Hytti, Robert Blackburn, Denise Fletcher and Friederike Welter

This content is available to you

Edited by Ulla Hytti, Robert Blackburn, Denise Fletcher and Friederike Welter

This content is available to you

John A. Davis and Mark A. Farrell

This content is available to you

John A. Davis and Mark A. Farrell

In this chapter we argue that the higher education sector and the leaders of universities are remarkably resistant to change, and that the main impetus for innovation in higher education is the government. In an increasingly competitive and globalized world, governments look to higher education as a means to earn export dollars, make a contribution to society’s problems, and provide an educated work force for the economy. In this chapter we demonstrate that the view of higher education as a public good has been replaced with a government philosophy and policy direction that the main beneficiary of higher education is the private individual. In short, the individual receives a private benefit and as such is a consumer of higher education. Concomitantly, government is looking to the individual to shoulder an increasing financial burden as shrinking government budgets are stretched to meet the demands of other areas of the economy. The result is reduced government funding, increasing competition from traditional and non-traditional providers, and an increasingly demanding and sophisticated student/consumer.