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Marijke Breuning and John Ishiyama

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Marijke Breuning and John Ishiyama

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Edited by James M. Scott, Ralph G. Carter, Brandy Jolliff Scott and Jeffrey S. Lantis

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David J. O’Brien

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David J. O’Brien

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Bill Lee

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Bill Lee

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Edited by Wendy Murphy and Jennifer Tosti-Kharas

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Edited by Jeffrey L. Bernstein

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Jeffrey L. Bernstein

Almost thirty years ago, when I was applying to graduate school in political science, my senior thesis adviser at Washington University, Charles Franklin, described me in his letter of recommendation (I’m paraphrasing) as someone who thought about politics like a scientist, rather than like some kid who liked politics. I took, and continue to take, these words as a compliment, as I know they were intended. I pursued graduate study out of a desire to take this subject that I had always enjoyed following and to study it with more analytical rigor.