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David Boje and Grace A. Rosile

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Edited by Marta Sinclair

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Melissa S. Cardon and Charles Y. Murnieks

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Edited by Friederike Welter and David Urbano

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Edited by Keith Townsend, Mark N.K. Saunders, Rebecca Loudoun and Emily A. Morrison

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Edited by Mike Wright, David J. Ketchen, Jr. and Timothy Clark

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Edited by David W. Stewart and Daniel M. Ladik

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Daniel M. Ladik and David W. Stewart

The (most) common mistake is not to “tell a story,” but only assemble different related parts. “Telling a good story” means to critically analyze what has been done before and demonstrate convincingly why something is changing. A significant contribution to knowledge does not happen in isolation and needs to be contextualized to the current situation.

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Edited by David W. Stewart and Daniel M. Ladik

Publication of a paper in a journal is the culmination of a process. The publication process begins with an idea that is developed and refined until it lends itself to empirical research or conceptual elaboration. The idea must be place in the context of extant research and theory, and something ‘new’ must be identified. Idea development is followed by empirical research, conceptual elaboration, and/or theory development. The idea, its elaboration, and the results of any empirical research or theory development then need to be documented in a fashion that is accessible and meaningful to readers in some well-defined audience. That audience is the readership of the journal for which the paper is intended. Throughout the development process it is helpful to obtain feedback by having others read and comment on the evolving paper and by making formal and informal presentations where ideas can be discussed, sharpened and polished. At some place in the cycle, the feedback and refinement process reach the point of diminishing returns, which suggests it is time to submit the paper. Submission starts a process of review and revision, which results in publication or rejection by the target journal. Rejection may result in revision of the paper for another journal based on feedback, and the process begins again.

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Edited by David W. Stewart and Daniel M. Ladik