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Basil Oberholzer

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Basil Oberholzer

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Basil Oberholzer

When popular Michael Manley took office as the Prime Minister of Jamaica in 1972, the country suffered from high illiteracy, unemployment and poverty. In the two decades before, the private sector had proven not to be able to guarantee long-term economic and social development. The government was expected to initiate change and steer growth (Davis, 1986, p. 77). Immediately after his election, Manley started the program he had promised: among other measures, a minimum wage was established; his land reform redistributed farmland to small-scale farmers; education at all levels became free; adult education programs reduced illiteracy. Did the story end as a success? To finance the program, the government ran high budget deficits that were mainly financed by foreign capital flows. The government expanded, while support for the private sector was reduced. This prompted capital flight (Shams, 1989, p. 75). Capital leaving the country meant currency devaluation, inflation, and economic contraction. Violence spread over the country. Manley lost his election in 1980.

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Basil Oberholzer

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Peter J. Rimmer

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Peter J. Rimmer

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Peter J. Rimmer

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Bruce Porter, Jackie Dugard, Daniela Ikawa and Lilian Chenwi

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John Hatchard

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Terry Marsden, Claire Lamine and Sergio Schneider