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  • Research Handbooks in Business and Management series

Emma Stringfellow

Kirton and Greene (2010) argue that an emphasis on a voluntary, unilateral managerial approach is an “essential dimension” of the (Anglo-Saxon) diversity management (DM) discourse. Diversity management has therefore been criticised as representing a “soft option” for employers, emphasising a top-down, management-led approach and giving managers the power to define problematic areas (Liff 1997; Kirton and Greene 2010). It is questionable, however, whether this applies in continental Europe, where issues of equality are usually regulated through social dialogue or collective bargaining. This chapter compares the unilateral managerial versus social dialogue dimension of diversity management in Sweden, France and Germany. The chapter examines the main actors driving diversity management in each country; what their motivations were for doing so; and how this impacted on the extent of a social dialogue approach. It then looks at the extent and quality of social dialogue on diversity management and what form it has taken – ranging from co-determination at one end of the spectrum (where unions take the leading role in designing and implementing DM policies); through genuinely negotiated agreements on issues directly or indirectly related to promoting diversity; to joint initiatives and projects; to the façade of collective bargaining in which unions are invited to sign or reject agreements without any real negotiation. The chapter then looks at how social dialogue might have shaped diversity management, and vice versa, in each country.
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  • Research Handbooks in Business and Management series

Edited by Alain Klarsfeld, Eddy S. Ng, Lize A.E. Booysen, Liza Castro Christiansen and Bård Kuvaas

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  • Research Handbooks in Business and Management series

Edited by Alain Klarsfeld, Eddy S. Ng, Lize A.E. Booysen, Liza Castro Christiansen and Bård Kuvaas

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  • Research Handbooks in Business and Management series

Edited by Alain Klarsfeld, Eddy S. Ng, Lize A.E. Booysen, Liza Castro Christiansen and Bård Kuvaas

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  • Research Handbooks in Business and Management series

Edited by Alain Klarsfeld, Eddy S. Ng, Lize A.E. Booysen, Liza Castro Christiansen and Bård Kuvaas

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Edited by Timothy Clark, Mike Wright and David J. Ketchen Jr.

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Timothy Clark, Mike Wright and David J. Ketchen Jr.

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  • New Horizons in International Business series

Robert Taylor

Asian Countries, especially China, have in recent years enjoyed high rates of economic growth, offering unparalleled opportunities for investors and traders from both inside and outside the region. While there are moves towards Asian economic integration, barriers must be overcome: witness maritime disputes in the South China Sea, differing levels of development, and deficient domestic institutional structures, which inhibit advanced economic cooperation. Additionally, a number of regional integrative bodies with overlapping jurisdictions and responsibilities impede effective decision making. The region also suffers from inadequate physical infrastructure, although the Chinese leaders have been proactive in promoting the intra- and inter-regional One Belt One Road (BRI) and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) initiatives. This is the general context within which the following chapters relating to multinational corporations (MNCs) may be understood. Key words: economic integration, foreign direct investment (FDI), connectivity, One Belt One Road (BRI), Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB).
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Edited by Timothy Clark, Mike Wright and David J. Ketchen Jr.

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Edited by Timothy Clark, Mike Wright and David J. Ketchen Jr.