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Convenience in white-collar crime

Convenience in White-Collar Crime

Petter Gottschalk

Convenience is a concept that was theoretically mainly associated with efficiency in time savings. Today, convenience is associated with a number of other characteristics, such as reduced effort and reduced pain. Convenience is associated with terms such as fast, easy, and safe. Convenience says something about attractiveness and accessibility. A convenient individual is not necessarily bad or lazy. On the contrary, the person can be seen as smart and rational. Convenience orientation is conceptualized as the value that individuals and organizations place on actions with inherent characteristics of saving time and effort. Convenience orientation can be considered a value-like construct that influences behavior and decision-making.

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Paul Sparrow and Cary L. Cooper

The chapter summarises recent changes in the HR function. HR directors have developed strategic insight into their organisation, focusing their function on the need to look “into” the organisation, and its strategy, and help ensure the effective execution of change, as part of a team of other senior leaders. As such, they have had to evidence the contribution that people management can have to business challenges such as innovation, productivity, lean management, customer centricity, and the globalisation of operations and organisation capabilities. They have learned to understand the complexity of their organisation’s business models and the different options that exist in terms of organisation design. It notes two over-riding debates or narratives that have come to activity: the notion of talent management; forging a clear link, and line of sight, from the strategy and the changes in business model this often entails, and the engagement of the workforce. The chapter signals the re-emergence of a range of societal debates. It organises the future HRM research agenda into four topics: the role of HR strategy, structure and architecture; the role of key HR processes; key performance enablers and key performance outcomes.

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Thomas Garavan, Alma McCarthy and Ronan Carbery

This chapter charts the landscape of international human resource development (IHRD) and engages with four key strands of IHRD scholarship that point to its possible boundaries. The chapter maps out a number of contextual drivers that are shaping IHRD as both an academic field of research and a set of organisational practices. The chapter proposes an overarching framework to conceptualise the terrain of IHRD. The chapter summarises the focus of the Handbook and summarises the individual chapters and how they are organised. Finally, the chapter proposes a number of priority research areas that will help to give the construct legitimacy as a field of research. The chapter engages in these debates while also acknowledging the emergent, dynamic and constantly evolving nature of the IHRD field.

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Edited by Paul Sparrow and Cary L. Cooper

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Edited by Mellani Day, Mary C. Boardman and Norris F. Krueger

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Mellani Day, Mary C. Boardman and Norris F. Krueger

The introduction to this handbook presents an overview of issues that will be introduced in the rest of the chapters with respect to the nascent field of neuroentrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship researchers have begun to investigate brain-based research methods; however, hurdles such as a lack of familiarity with and training in neuroscience research design and implementation, along with interpretation of reactions in the brain to stimuli in laboratory experiments, has prevented any wide-scale adoption of these methods. Initial questions that neuroscientists wrestle with, and that those who would focus on brain-based research should consider, such as philosophical stance on brain versus mind and causation, are addressed.

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Edited by Mellani Day, Mary C. Boardman and Norris F. Krueger

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Dirk Lindebaum

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Ronald J. Burke

This chapter sets the stage for the rest of the collection. Adults spend over one-third of their waking hours at work. Work can enhance or diminish well-being. Well-being is an umbrella concept including happiness, satisfaction, positive affect and flourishing among others. Stress at work is a major factor influencing well-being. Workplace stress exerts a high financial cost to societies, thus well-being is important for both individuals and organizations. Sources of stress that have received research attention include long work hours, autocratic leadership, bias and discrimination, sexual harassment, low levels of job security, and unsafe work environments. The goal for organizations then is to create more psychologically healthy and positive workplaces. Factors associated with such workplaces include types of leadership (transformational, servant), levels of job security, reasonable workloads, opportunities to increase person–job fit, training and development opportunities, high levels of job civility and fairness, investments in developing human capital in all employees, and fun at work. Organizational case studies of psychologically healthy workplaces are offered.

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Patrizia Hoyer, Chris Steyaert and Julia C. Nentwich