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Marcela Ramírez Pasillas, Ethel Brundin and Magdalena Markowska

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Ronald J. Burke

This chapter sets the stage for the rest of the collection. Adults spend over one-third of their waking hours at work. Work can enhance or diminish well-being. Well-being is an umbrella concept including happiness, satisfaction, positive affect and flourishing among others. Stress at work is a major factor influencing well-being. Workplace stress exerts a high financial cost to societies, thus well-being is important for both individuals and organizations. Sources of stress that have received research attention include long work hours, autocratic leadership, bias and discrimination, sexual harassment, low levels of job security, and unsafe work environments. The goal for organizations then is to create more psychologically healthy and positive workplaces. Factors associated with such workplaces include types of leadership (transformational, servant), levels of job security, reasonable workloads, opportunities to increase person–job fit, training and development opportunities, high levels of job civility and fairness, investments in developing human capital in all employees, and fun at work. Organizational case studies of psychologically healthy workplaces are offered.

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Flemming Sørensen and Francesco Lapenta

This introductory chapter of the service innovation research methods book introduces the aim and purpose of the book. It describes the theoretical framework that underpins the book and its individual chapters. The framework includes considerations about a) the theoretical and methodological dimensions of service innovation, b) contemporary trends in service innovation and research, and c) society’s expectations of service innovation research. Additionally, the chapter introduces the content of the individual chapters and thus provides an overview of the contents of the book.

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Edited by Gregory M. Randolph, Michael T. Tasto and Robert F. Salvino Jr.

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Gregory M. Randolph

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Edited by Gregory M. Randolph, Michael T. Tasto and Robert F. Salvino Jr.

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Susana C. Santos, Craig Mitchell, Hans Landström, Alain Fayolle and António Caetano

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Edited by Gregory M. Randolph, Michael T. Tasto and Robert F. Salvino Jr.

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Frédérique Six and Koen Verhoest

This edited volume is the first endeavour to systematically investigate the role of trust in the different relations within regulatory regimes. Trust as a multifaceted concept is contested within public administration and political science in general and especially within the relation between regulator and regulated party. The aim of this book is to scope the field and to set the agenda for further research. In this introductory chapter we map the different relations within regulatory regimes and review empirical research into the role of trust within the different relations. Our review reveals several themes that we address in the different empirical chapters and in the research agenda formulated in the concluding chapter.
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Richard Philip Winter

Chapter 1 portrays managing as a sensemaking process and assumes academic-managers will exercise some degree of choice in choosing perspectives of managing that best fit their social worlds and their own personal beliefs, values and goal intentions. A process of sensemaking lets managers see how their thinking may be associated with certain working relationships and scholarship outcomes within HEI and their wider communities. Keywords: sensemaking; ideologies; values; emotions; goal intentions; role expectations