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Table of cases

A Critical Assessment of the EU-SADC Economic Partnership Agreement

Clair Gammage

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References

Authority and Exchange in a Global Age

David Reisman

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References

What Can Be Done About Wealth Inequality?

Roger A. McCain

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Preface

A Critical Assessment of the EU-SADC Economic Partnership Agreement

Clair Gammage

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Introduction: plan and scope of the book

What Can Be Done About Wealth Inequality?

Roger A. McCain

Sketches the plan of the book. Argues that wealth inequality is the basis of many other economic problems, noting that concentrations of wealth inevitably become concentrations of political power; this concentration of political power makes political democracy increasingly difficult to sustain; concentration of wealth inevitably creates instability and differences of social status, and inequality of wealth is the major cause of income inequality.

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Introduction

A Critical Assessment of the EU-SADC Economic Partnership Agreement

Clair Gammage

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Integration through law

A Critical Assessment of the EU-SADC Economic Partnership Agreement

Clair Gammage

Chapter 1 presents the main epistemological framework and ontological claims of the book and asserts that regions should be understood primarily as legal regimes. Through the marriage of material power, ideational forces and institutions this book aims to promote an understanding of regions as fundamentally legal regimes. The law generates an assumption of the ‘right’ and ‘just’ way to live, guiding behaviour of institutions and of people through legal codification of norms. Legal philosophers are concerned with the validity of legal norms, their claim to correctness, and to understanding the reasoning and logic of the legal system while sociologically informed analyses of law seek to reveal the practical or empirically valid nature of legal norms in relation to other spheres of action, such as politics and the economy. Using the discourse theory of law, this book proposes that legitimate law is that which is normatively perceived to provide ‘good’ reasons for action. This book aims to demonstrate how legitimate law can emerge from a discursive and participative process of deliberation. It will be argued that the EPAs have created discursive spaces for deliberation albeit the inclusion of non-state actors in that process across the regional groupings has been limited. As such, the extent to which the EPAs constitute legitimate legal regimes in a Habermasian sense is questionable.

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The earth is flat

Authority and Exchange in a Global Age

David Reisman

The reduction of tariff and non-tariff barriers, improvements in transport and communications and an overall rise in standards of living have produced a unparalleled expansion in trade, a new world division of labour and an integration of heterogeneous cultures. Globalisation at the same time is often blamed for widening inequalities within the nations and for a new world division of labour between the rich countries and the poor that governments and not the market alone have the duty to address.

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Abbreviations and acronyms

A Critical Assessment of the EU-SADC Economic Partnership Agreement

Clair Gammage