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Social investment: concepts, uses and theoretical perspectives

International and Critical Perspectives

James Midgley

The first chapter by James Midgley provides a broad introduction to the concept of social investment and the way it is used in different academic and professional fields. Noting that the term ‘social investment’ is poorly defined, he offers a definition and examines the meaning of terms such as ‘investment’, ‘consumption’, ‘income’, ‘assets’ and ‘capital’ which are widely used in economics. The chapter then reviews the different ways the term ‘social investment’ has been used in four academic and professional fields, namely social policy, nonprofit management, community studies and development studies where investment ideas have been influential since the 1950s. The chapter contends that scholars will benefit from understanding the way the concept of social investment has been employed in these different academic and professional fields. It concludes by suggesting that may be possible to synthesize these different approaches to promote a comprehensive and globally relevant interpretation that will enhance the academic and policy relevance of social investment ideas. Key words: social investment, international social welfare, social policy

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Preface

International and Critical Perspectives

Edited by James Midgley, Espen Dahl and Amy Conley Wright

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Introduction: plan and scope of the book

What Can Be Done About Wealth Inequality?

Roger A. McCain

Sketches the plan of the book. Argues that wealth inequality is the basis of many other economic problems, noting that concentrations of wealth inevitably become concentrations of political power; this concentration of political power makes political democracy increasingly difficult to sustain; concentration of wealth inevitably creates instability and differences of social status, and inequality of wealth is the major cause of income inequality.

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Introduction

International and Critical Perspectives

James Midgley, Espen Dahl and Amy Conley Wright

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Michael Schneider

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Mike Pottenger and John King

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Michael Schneider

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Andreas Bergh, Therese Nilsson and Daniel Waldenström

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Andreas Bergh, Therese Nilsson and Daniel Waldenström

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Andreas Bergh, Therese Nilsson and Daniel Waldenström