Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,946 items :

  • Innovation and Technology x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Richard Hawkins and Knut Blind

This introduction explores the conceptual background and definitions that pertain to understanding standards and standardization in the context of innovation. A general overview is provided of the themes explored in the chapters that follow.

This content is available to you

Shubha Ghosh

This content is available to you

Preface

Creating Business Models with New Forms of Innovation​

Stephen Flowers, Martin Meyer and Jari Kuusisto

This content is available to you

The new frontier of innovation

Creating Business Models with New Forms of Innovation​

Stephen Flowers, Martin Meyer and Jari Kuusisto

This is an introductory chapter that outlines the main context for the book – the shift in the ability of users and others to mobilise and coordinate the resources required in order to innovate. This book provides a detailed account of the way in which goods and services are produced and consumed at the new frontier of innovation. Each of the chapters explores a different aspect of this developing frontier and provide detailed case studies of the different forms the processes of creation and consumption are now taking. This is not an exercise in prediction, rather it holds up a mirror to what is happening around us and provides a new toolkit to help make sense of complex and confusing situations. The exciting, or disturbing, reality is that the real-world cases presented throughout the book provide illustrations of possible futures for firms, sectors and entire industries.

This content is available to you

Marika Lüders, Tor W. Andreassen, Simon Clatworthy and Tore Hillestad

In the introductory chapter, the editors respond to the fundamental goal for any firm: to maintain and build customer trust. The overall themes of the book are innovation, trust and customer experience. The book’s title – Innovating for Trust – reflects trust as an antecedent to adoption and commercial success, as well as an outcome of adoption and commercial success. In short, managers and innovators need to build trust into all activities of innovation. The chapter starts by defining and discussing the notion of innovation. Attempts to innovate are ultimately about forecasting what the future entails, and what customers may want. Innovative capabilities consequently include creative change thinking; not as an isolated act of a genius but as acts of picking up signals of change and opportunities. Also discussed are dimensions and types of innovations, and the editors distinguish between radical and incremental innovations, on the one hand, and sustaining and disruptive innovations, on the other hand. The notion of the innovation journey as a guide for reading the book is offered, together with an overview of the main contributions of the different parts of the book.

This content is available to you

Preface

Innovations, Networks and Collaborations

Edited by Charlie Karlsson, Martin Andersson and Lina Bjerke

This content is available to you

Introduction

Innovations, Networks and Collaborations

Martin Andersson, Lina Bjerke and Charlie Karlsson

This content is available to you

Fenghua Li

At the centre of the controversy surrounding the reversal of awards in the Yukos cases is the provisional application laid down in Article 45 of the Energy Charter Treaty (ECT), which allows a signatory to unilaterally undertake to give affirmative legal effect to the obligations under the ECT on a voluntary and provisional basis. The paper examines the two disparate approaches adopted by the Arbitral Tribunal and the Hague District Court in interpreting the provisional application, namely the ‘all-or-nothing’ approach which necessitates an analysis and determination of whether the principle of provisional application per se is inconsistent with national laws of a signatory and the ‘piecemeal’ approach that requires provisional application to be dependable on the consistency of each provision of the ECT with national laws. The paper further scrutinises the effect that should be given to the provisional application of the ECT and maintains that the controversy has the potential to generate intricate tensions between the finality and rectification of arbitral awards and between international arbitral autonomy and judicial scrutiny instrument, and will have a conclusive impact on the fate of the petition of the Russian Federation.

This content is available to you

Helin M Laufer

This paper will critically analyse the International Committee of the Red Cross’ new weapons review and emphasise the importance of considering human rights in the assessment of the legality of weapons. Further, the paper will illustrate this practically by analysing the legality of drones and killer robots from the perspective of the right to life and the prohibition against torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment.

This content is available to you

Letizia Lo Giacco

Based on the ever-increasing interpretation and application of international law by domestic courts, this paper offers an insight into the practices of judicial citation of international and domestic jurisdictions while adjudicating international criminal law related matters. The paper considers selected instances of judicial citation and operates a prima facie distinction between judicial citation as a finding device and as a justification exercise. It is argued that domestic courts rely on international judicial decisions primarily as a finding device whilst international case law deals with domestic judicial decisions in the realm of justification. The analysis of this material triggers reflections on the relevance of judicial citation for the doctrine of sources of international law, inasmuch as it adds to the formation of normative expectations on subjects of international law, as well as for a scholarly conceptualisation of contemporary international law-making.