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Armel Kerrest

Although we have long moved on from a spacefaring environment dominated by the actions of two State powers, modern space law is still centred on the notion of ‘launching States’, including as the basic concept for applying the Liability Convention. This chapter asks whether the legal framework established at the time of adoption of the Liability Convention is still efficient for the regulation of commercial space ventures, in particular by questioning the continuing relevance and definition of the concept of ‘launching State’. This question will be considered in four steps, discussing in turn (1) the importance of the notion of launching States; (2) the interest of holding States liable for damage caused by a space object; (3) the implications of private entities getting involved in this framework; and (4) the entity carrying the risk created by private space activities. Keywords: launching State; liability; private actors

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Jan Wouters, Philip De Man and Rik Hansen

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Table of Treaties

The Evolution of Australian Policy on Trade and Investment

Andrew D. Mitchell, Elizabeth Sheargold and Tania Voon

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Regulatory Autonomy and the Evolution of Australia’s Participation in PTAs and BITs

The Evolution of Australian Policy on Trade and Investment

Andrew D. Mitchell, Elizabeth Sheargold and Tania Voon

Although a major proponent of multilateralism, in recent decades Australia has become an enthusiastic participant in bilateral and regional economic initiatives. This chapter provides an overview of Australia’s entry into preferential trade agreements and bilateral investment treaties, situating each generation of these agreements in its political and economic context. It examines how the scope, objectives and content of these agreements have changed over time, identifying key factors that have influenced these changes. The chapter also explains the meaning of ‘regulatory autonomy’ in this book and outlines the structure and purpose of the rest of the book. By their very nature, trade and investment agreements limit regulatory autonomy, by precluding States from implementing policies that adversely affect international trade or foreign investment. This chapter explains why services, intellectual property and investment are of particular concern for Australia, as explored in greater detail in subsequent chapters. Keywords: international economic law, investment, policy space, public international law, regionalism, trade

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Preface

Towards an Integrative Approach

Edited by Harmen Van der Wilt and Christophe Paulussen

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Linda J. Silberman and Franco Ferrari

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Table of legislation

Strategic Models and Factors

Antonios E. Platsas

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Edited by Jens David Ohlin

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Table of cases

Strategic Models and Factors

Antonios E. Platsas

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Edited by Jens David Ohlin