Browse by title

You are looking at 1-10 of 535 items :

  • Public International Law x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Gideon Boas and Pascale Chifflet

International criminal justice describes the response of the international community to mass atrocity. How we respond to war, to the rupture of society and to systematized murder and persecution is at the heart of the issue. Which forms of transitional justice we respond with, and how our goals are best achieved, are important questions. But international criminal justice is about more than responses. How do we learn from history or, sometimes, fail to do so? Can we use our understanding of human psychology to better respond to mass atrocity, or better, to prevent it or react to address it sooner? What of the sociological elements that are infused in our response to heinous international crimes; how do these affect our understanding and practice of international criminal justice? Key words: international; criminal; justice; community; atrocity

This content is available to you

Robert Kolb

This content is available to you

Padraig McAuliffe

This chapter outlines the core focus of this book, namely the malleability of the structures that underpin poverty and inequality in post-conflict states. It defines what is meant by ‘post-conflict’ for the purposes of the book and argues that certain structural and post-conflict variables have been insufficiently included in fourth-generation transitional justice.

This content is available to you

Edited by William A. Schabas and Shannonbrooke Murphy

This content is available to you

Edited by William A. Schabas and Shannonbrooke Murphy

This content is available to you

Edited by Wayne Sandholtz and Christopher A. Whytock

This content is available to you

Edited by Wayne Sandholtz and Christopher A. Whytock

This content is available to you

Edited by William A. Schabas and Shannonbrooke Murphy

This content is available to you

Wayne Sandholtz and Christopher A. Whytock

This content is available to you

Mónica Pinto

The maintenance of international peace and security is the very first purpose of the United Nations. The International Court of Justice, the single most important source of international jurisprudence in this area, has a clear understanding of this goal and of its role in achieving it. From the landmark Corfu Channel case to the seminal Nicaragua case and afterwards, the International Court of Justice has developed a sustainable case law on the use of force in international law, in which the Nicaragua case endures as the single pre-eminent judgment. This chapter considers three key aspects established by the Court’s case law — the illegality of unilateral uses of force by states, the necessary threshold for a use of force to give rise to an entitlement to self-defense, and the complementarity of action by United Nations organs in this field. KEYWORDS: peace and security judgments, International Court of Justice, Nicaragua case, use of force, aggression, self-defense