Browse by title

You are looking at 1-10 of 171 items :

  • Comparative Law x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Simon Marsden

Chapter 1 introduces the book, sets out the scope and aims, and outlines the research questions and methodology. A common framework for analysing each of the regimes is explained and justified, with reference to the scholarship of international law, international political economy and global politics. Chapter 1 also outlines and distinguishes between regions and subregions in Asia, and discusses environmental regimes in the literatures. It considers the geography of Asia as a region and the environmental issues it faces, examining the numerous international and regional institutions that operate there. It also reviews the discourse and scholarship in connection with regions and subregions developed by these institutions and by academic commentators, with a focus on the development of further institutions to respond to the needs identified. The notion and practicality of regime effectiveness is also considered. Keywords: Asia, subregions, environment, regime, effectiveness

This content is available to you

Edited by Carol Harlow, Päivi Leino and Giacinto della Cananea

This content is available to you

Edited by Carol Harlow, Päivi Leino and Giacinto della Cananea

This content is available to you

Carol Harlow, Giacinto della Cananea and Päivi Leino

This content is available to you

Timothy Earle

This content is available to you

Michele Graziadei and Lionel Smith

This content is available to you

S. I. Strong, Katia Fach Gómez and Laura Carballo Piñeiro

This content is available to you

S. I. Strong, Katia Fach Gómez and Laura Carballo Piñeiro

This content is available to you

S. I. Strong, Katia Fach Gómez and Laura Carballo Piñeiro

Chapter 1 introduces the book by describing the purpose and structure of the text as well as the motivating rationales behind the various elements. This chapter begins that analysis by considering the importance of language and culture in the practice of law and examining the new reality of globalization and the challenges for lawyers working in two languages in either the domestic or international context. The text notes that because legal language is best acquired in context, each of the chapters in the book is written in both English and Spanish, with the English text targeted toward native Spanish speakers while the Spanish sections is aimed at native English speakers so as to facilitate acquisition of foreign legal language skills. The chapter also describes how the book adopts a comparative approach within language families so as to facilitate readers’ competence within particular languages rather than with single countries. Thus, the English sections throughout the book discuss US and English law, with occasional references to other English-speaking jurisdictions, while the Spanish sections focus primarily on Spain and Mexico, again with references to other Spanish-speaking countries. Because each section is aimed at different audiences, the text will reflect a number of key differences exist between the English and Spanish sections. However, many chapters include identical summaries in both languages so that readers can double-check their understanding. Each chapter also identifies key vocabulary relating to the topics under discussion so as to help readers increase their competence in legal terms of art.