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Why is imitation not innovation?

Alternative Approaches to the Pro-Innovation Bias

Benoît Godin

Innovation theorists relegate to non-existence a series of concepts outside the semantic field of innovation. Such is the case of imitation. The chapter looks at when, how and why imitation, as an early meaning of innovation, was removed from the discourses on innovation. The chapter suggests that cultural values, disciplinary work, market ideology and semantics are key factors in explaining the neglect of imitation in discourses on innovation, particularly theories.

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Table of constitutions, legislation, and regulations

Sustainable, Just, and Democratic

Edited by Melissa K. Scanlan

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Table of cases

Sustainable, Just, and Democratic

Edited by Melissa K. Scanlan

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Prologue

Sustainable, Just, and Democratic

Edited by Melissa K. Scanlan

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Preface

Australia and the OECD

Aynsley Kellow and Peter Carroll

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Introduction: innovation – from the forbidden to a cliché

Alternative Approaches to the Pro-Innovation Bias

Benoît Godin and Dominique Vinck

The study of innovation became voluminous with a lot of theories, models, frameworks, narratives and handbooks but still reflect an innovation bias. The theorists contribute to the construction of a dominant representation of innovation, an ideology, as technological and industrial, and as a good for the economy and the society. Little attention is paid to the non-innovators. Starting with the question ‘what has been left out?’, this book suggests a change of approach. It examines innovation from a different perspective, dealing with phenomena rarely taken seriously by scholars of innovation: resistance to innovation, non-adoption, sluggishness of innovators, imitation, non-users, failure, outlaw innovation, unintended consequences, maintenance of (existing) innovation, non-innovators, de-adoption, slow innovation, innovation fads, re-shaping and adaptation of the innovation, rationale for not innovating, the social and political nature of innovation and so on. The purpose of this book is to assemble studies on these phenomena and to examine them under the umbrella of NOvation.

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Introduction

Australia and the OECD

Aynsley Kellow and Peter Carroll

The broad aim of the first chapter is to provide an overview of the OECD in the world of international organisations as it adapts to the frequent change that characterises international relations and global policy regimes. It describes the several and sometimes conflicting, Australian views of the organisation, emphasising its varying value in differing policy areas. The next section of the chapter provides a broad description of the organisation’s aims, organisational structure and key decision processes for the reader with little or no prior knowledge of the organisation. The final section indicates the content of each of the chapters in the book. Key words: role; adaptation; perceptions; organisational structure

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Foreword

Sustainable, Just, and Democratic

Edited by Melissa K. Scanlan

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Climate change, system change, and the path forward

Sustainable, Just, and Democratic

Melissa K. Scanlan

The current global economic system, which is fueled by externalizing environmental costs, growing exponentially, consuming more, and a widening wealth gap between rich and poor, is misaligned to meet the climate imperative to rapidly reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs). Amidst this system breakdown as we reach the end of the Industrial Age, the new economy movement has emerged to provide an alternative approach where ecological balance, wealth equity, and vibrant democracy are central to economic activity. Laws are the fundamental infrastructure that undergirds our economic and political system. Environmental law is typically conceived as a set of rules that establish pollutant limits for specific waterbodies, protect an identified species, or direct an industry to use a required technology. Although necessary, these types of law do not address the fundamentals of our political economy, and the most dramatic failure of environmental law is seen in increasing amounts of GHGs and global climate disruption. In order to develop a new economic system that is aligned with a climate and economic justice imperative, we need laws that will facilitate the new system and discourage the old. This chapter discusses systems thinking and systems change, highlighting leverage points to achieve change. It gives an overview of the new economy movement that has emerged to provide a new narrative, and using a systems lens, identifies areas where the law needs to evolve to facilitate building a more sustainable, equitable, and democratic future.

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Michael Howlett and Ishani Mukherjee

The introductory chapter provides a brief overview of the central questions that have inspired policy formulation research in the policy sciences. Distinguishing policy formulation as that activity in the policy process during which policy-makers craft solutions for identified problems, the chapter depicts public policies as being, in essence, government efforts to affect changes in their own or in public behaviour. Formulation is portrayed in this chapter as the result of an interplay of knowledge-based analytics and power-based politics as governments act on articulating feasible policy options to meet social goals, resulting in complex assemblages of policy aims and policy means that are unique to each jurisdiction. The chapter also explains the organizational logic behind how the contributions of this Handbook have been organized.