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Preface

Australia and the OECD

Aynsley Kellow and Peter Carroll

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Introduction

Australia and the OECD

Aynsley Kellow and Peter Carroll

The broad aim of the first chapter is to provide an overview of the OECD in the world of international organisations as it adapts to the frequent change that characterises international relations and global policy regimes. It describes the several and sometimes conflicting, Australian views of the organisation, emphasising its varying value in differing policy areas. The next section of the chapter provides a broad description of the organisation’s aims, organisational structure and key decision processes for the reader with little or no prior knowledge of the organisation. The final section indicates the content of each of the chapters in the book. Key words: role; adaptation; perceptions; organisational structure

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Robert Kolb

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Andrew T. H. Tan

How to understand and explain the evolutions as well as predict the future directions of bilateral relations between the United States and China has become an imperative task for both policy-makers and academic scholars. Borrowing insights from three mainstream international relations (IR) theories, realism, liberalism and constructivism, this chapter suggests a three-stage, perceptual model of ‘threat–interest’ to explore the dynamics of Sino–US relations from 1949 to 2015. It argues that the nature of US–China relations, either cooperation or competition, is mainly shaped by the perceptions of leaders regarding security threats and economic interests between the two nations. How to manage their perceptions regarding each other and how to find a balance between cooperation and competition are the key issues for leaders in both the United States and China to manage their bilateral relations in the future. The next decade or two may be the best or worst times for US–China relations.
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Edited by Andrew T.H. Tan

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Edited by Andrew T.H. Tan

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Edited by Andrew T.H. Tan

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Edited by Andrew T.H. Tan

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Andrew T. H. Tan

The rise of China and the challenge it poses to US dominance is regarded as one of the most important issues in international relations today due to its implications not just on the dominant position of the United States but also the stability of the evolving post–Cold War international system. The relationship between the world’s two largest economies is crucial. Should they succeed in coming to an understanding, war will be avoided and a new regional and global equilibrium will be the result. While Henry Kissinger concluded that ‘the appropriate label for the Sino–American relationship is less partnership than co-evolution’ the process of working out the entente cordiale that would underpin such a co-evolution is complicated by a number of serious challenges, such as economic disputes, human rights issues, China’s emerging military power, the rise of Chinese nationalism, the apprehensions in Washington over China’s rise and growing Chinese assertiveness in Asia. It remains to be seen if an entente cordiale could be achieved before growing mutual mistrust and misperception lead to open conflict.
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Lorraine Elliott and William H. Schaedla