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Gordon C.K. Cheung

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Gordon C.K. Cheung

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Robert Kolb

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Jens Bartelson, Martin Hall and Jan Teorell

This introduction outlines the main problem areas addressed by this volume. In academic international relations, comparative politics and historical sociology, the study of state making has traditionally been focused on the emergence of states in early modern Europe. The introduction makes the case for a de-centering of the study of state making, by shifting its focus to other historical and geographical contexts. It also elaborates on the preconditions for such de-centering, by discussing how the anachronism and Eurocentrism widespread within this field are best overcome. The authors conclude that this is best accomplished by aligning the concerns of comparative politics and international relations more closely, by moving beyond the tendency to accord primacy to warfare when explaining the making of states, and, finally, by overcoming the divide between materialistic and ideational approaches to state making. This is followed by a brief overview and discussion of individual contributions.

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Yasushi Watanabe

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Robert Kolb

War is a perennial feature in the lives of peoples; peace, by contrast, is an ideal. This chapter explores a number of the general features of the international law relating to war and peace, looking at, for example, the ‘juridicalisation’ of international law, the influence of political regimes, the questions raised by the use of force, and ‘psychological unilateralism’.

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Michel Wieviorka

Culture is not an essence, it is produced and not only reproduced, it combines tradition and innovation. Cultural security means for some people the possibility to reproduce their culture, for others to produce new cultural forms. This means that some social conditions are fulfilled, and this is connected with the issue of human rights. The framework for these issues is global, and not only national, including the relationship between violence, war and security. The chapter provides some concrete analysis, and not only theoretical perspectives, taking the recent French experience as an example, and dealing with such issues as terrorism, Islam and migration.

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Gordon C.K. Cheung

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Edited by Jens Bartelson, Martin Hall and Jan Teorell

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Edited by Michael Heazle and Andrew O’Neil