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Stefania Marino, Rinus Penninx and Judith Roosblad

The book offers an analysis of the relationship between trade unions, immigration and migrant workers across 11 European countries in the period between 1990 and 2015. This introductory chapter explains the editors’ approach to this study, which is based on the comparative framework as developed in an earlier book by Penninx and Roosblad in 2000. This framework is critically reconsidered and its validity is checked in the light of recent contextual changes. It informs the development of the main questions that will underpin both the structure and content of the 11 country cases and the comparative analysis presented in the concluding chapter. In addition, this introduction addresses relevant methodological aspects and outlines the structure of the book.

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Foreword

New Contexts and Challenges in Europe

Edited by Stefania Marino, Judith Roosblad and Rinus Penninx

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Foreword

New Contexts and Challenges in Europe

Edited by Stefania Marino, Judith Roosblad and Rinus Penninx

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Preface

International Perspectives

Edited by Frank Trovato

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Frank Trovato

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Ben Page, Anastasia Christou and Elizabeth Mavroudi

This chapter argues that (despite some important exceptions) time, timing and temporality remain under-analysed in migration studies. It suggests that filling this gap is not just a question of rounding out the academic field, but that a focus on time has particular merits for developing distinctive insights into migrants’ own understandings of their own experiences. The chapter sets out the aim of the book, which is to critically assess the value of analysing international migration through a framework of time, space and timespace. It traces a journey from a focus on time to a focus on timespace, and on to a focus on time again. It argues that the critique of a hierarchy of separated time and space (which was at the centre of the emergence of the concept of timespace) has now been largely internalized so that, at this point, there is merit in reflecting on the differences between time and space through a plurality of conceptual frameworks. Keywords: time, timespace, temporality, space, international migration, migration studies

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Edited by Elizabeth Mavroudi, Ben Page and Anastasia Christou

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Benoît Mayer and François Crépeau

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Nina Bernstein

In the chapter, a reporter for the New York Times who has written extensively about immigration detention policies in various countries assesses the limits that investigative journalism faces in spurring detention reforms. She argues that while journalism occupies a privileged place in a democracy because it helps hold government to account, in practice it operates at a far messier intersection between the politics of reform and the contingencies and conventions of even the most robust news operation. The author focuses her analysis on the relationship between investigative journalism and the early efforts of the Barack Obama administration to overhaul immigration detention by creating “a truly civil detention system.” Today, the US detention system is larger than ever, abuses remain endemic, the government has massively expanded its capacity to lock up mothers and children in “family residential centers,” and the new administration is threatening to ramp up already record numbers of deportations.

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Michael J. Flynn and Matthew B. Flynn