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Colin Jones

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Colin Jones

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Colin Jones

The king, dictator, employer or teacher who does things for others which they might have accomplished for themselves thereby weakens the capacity and worth of citizens, workers and students. (Lindeman, 1926: 48)

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Colin Jones

Fear of freedom, of which its possessor is not necessarily aware, makes him see ghosts. Such an individual is actually taking refuge in an attempt to achieve security, which he prefers to the risks of liberty. (Freire, 1974: 20)

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Colin Jones

As we are … prisoners of the practices we choose, we had better develop them well.

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Colin Jones

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Colin Jones

Life demands all of its forms the ability simultaneously to be and to become. (Rose, 1997: 142)

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Colin Jones

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Colin Jones

Environment pierces to the very heart of life. If we probe to the beginnings of life, it is there no less intimately dependent on environment than in its completest manifestations. We never find and never can conceive life pure, unenvironed. (MacIver, 1917: 361)

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Colin Jones

Among all men, whether of the upper or lower orders, the differences are eternal and irreconcilable, between one individual and another, born under absolutely the same circumstances. One man is made of agate, another of oak; one of slate, another of clay. The education of the first is polishing; of the second, seasoning; of the third, rending; of the fourth, moulding. It is of no use to season the agate; it is vain to try and polish the slate; but both are fitted, by the qualities they possess, for services in which they may be honoured. (Ruskin, 1917: 198)