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Richard Philip Winter

Chapter 7 portrays academics and HEI as prosocial entities. A prosocial identity is attributed to managers, academics, students, and professional staff that define themselves, and their institutions in terms of prosocial attributes that involve helping, benefitting, and empathising with others at a particular time and in a given structural-cultural context. Three prosocial values (social idealism, social legitimacy, social contributions) are attributed to academic identity work in HEI. Keywords: prosocial identity; social idealism; social legitimacy; identity work; prosocial scholarship
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Richard Philip Winter

Chapter 5 grounds management and academic work in the sociology of the professions in order to show how academic-managers may encourage more collegiate and collaborative work settings, as well as reaching out in scholarly activity to a broader non-academic community. Legitimising academic work as inherently professional is seen as a valid way of connecting work to an academic’s service ethic and training, critical thinking and education concerns and/or shadow communities outside of academe. Keywords: professionalism; pluralism; collegiality; practitioners; diverse scholarship
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Richard Philip Winter

Chapter 9 introduces a model for perceiving and enacting scholarship differently in HEI. A key focus of the scholarship model is on identifying personal conditions (that is, cognitive complexity, cognitive empathy, prosocial value orientation, work engagement) and work environment conditions (that is, flexible work role descriptions, support for autonomy, relational job design, employee voice opportunities) for enabling different types of scholarship outcomes to be valued in HEI. Keywords: perspective taking; cognitive empathy; psychological flexibility; employee voice; prosocial outcomes
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Richard Philip Winter

Managing Academics contrasts three alternative perspectives of managing (professionalism, quality of worklife, prosocial identity) with the dominant perspective of managerialism in higher education institutions. The intention of the contrast is to: (1) challenge the notion that managing academics is a unitary, values-free process; (2) raise awareness of managing as a social process in which values and identity questions resonate as issues of importance to managers and the managed; and (3) help academic-managers influence and balance “hybrid” perspectives of managing and scholarship.
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Richard Philip Winter

Chapter 1 portrays managing as a sensemaking process and assumes academic-managers will exercise some degree of choice in choosing perspectives of managing that best fit their social worlds and their own personal beliefs, values and goal intentions. A process of sensemaking lets managers see how their thinking may be associated with certain working relationships and scholarship outcomes within HEI and their wider communities. Keywords: sensemaking; ideologies; values; emotions; goal intentions; role expectations
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Richard Philip Winter

Chapter 4 depicts management as a rational, top-down process for organising and rewarding academic work around norms of revenue generation and cost efficiency. Managing academics is seen as a highly efficient process when academic-managers manage other academics uniformly (free from emotions and humanist ideals) and achieve the greatest good (meeting or exceeding financial targets) for the lowest unit cost (flexible use of expensive academic labour). Keywords: managerialism; unitarism; financial management; competitive rankings; uniform research
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Richard Philip Winter

Chapter 8 describes some of the hybrid challenges academic-managers and HEI face as they respond to current pressures to be more efficient and business-like. Hybrid HEI are described as places of competing institutional logics, paradoxes and identity challenges where different types of academic work and scholarship might be contested, reconciled and reconstructed. Possible hybrid work practices for enabling competing perspectives of scholarship presented in earlier chapters to be combined in HEI are also discussed. Keywords: hybrid organisations; hybridity; hybrid work practices; identity challenges; ambidextrous scholarship
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Richard Philip Winter

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Richard Philip Winter

Chapter 2 presents a three-level change model to explicate the structural and value-based conditions underpinning academic work and identity in HEI. The model highlights how corporate reforms in higher education (national–sector level) have fundamentally reshaped the nature of the public university (organisational level) and the psychological meaning academics attach to their work roles and identities (individual level). Key studies of academic work and identity are discussed including the different identity-related responses of academics as they adjust (or not) to a more managerialist working environment. Keywords: academic work; academic identity; corporate reforms; public university; change model
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Mohammad Ta’Amnha, Susan Sayce and Olga Tregaskis