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Lisa T. Stickney, Alexander L. A. Crossman, Joanna Crossman and Lydia Richards

In the U.S. alone, on average 13 employees die each day in workplace accidents. The industry which tops the list – construction – accounts for nearly 20 percent of workplace deaths. Ideally, workplaces are designed and maintained to be safe. However, workplace safety goes beyond construction accidents, or even the slip/fall common in food service. More work is done by knowledge workers, and with more employees spending increasingly more time at a computer, we are seeing a growing incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome and other issues related to the sedentary nature of work. Workplace safety, housed within Human Resources, is concerned with employees’ safety and well-being, and works to prevent and resolve safety-related issues. The exercises which follow will be of interest to faculty and students alike.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

Much has been written about the use of technology in the classroom. The term “smart” has become associated with a technology-enhanced classroom. In this chapter, we offer a different take on the term “‘smart’ classroom.” A “smart” classroom is one in which the educator and the learners alike engage in a transformative process. Technology may be part of that process, but it is not an end in itself. In the first section of the chapter, we examine the assumptions we make about the term “‘smart’ classroom.” The second section of the chapter introduces strategies that educators can use to increase learner engagement in the classroom (e.g., the Socratic method, use of artifacts, case studies). The chapter closes with an examination of “nontraditional” approaches to leadership pedagogy, for example service-learning projects, simulations, the flipped classroom, and the “mobile” classroom.

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Manja Klemenčič

The trend in liberal higher education is to afford students enhanced capabilities to intervene in their higher education environments, especially in quality assessment, accountability and performance. This development is premised on acknowledging that students have valuable insights into educational processes. Scholarship based on stakeholder theories explains student involvement in promoting quality through their contribution to the efficiency of decisions regarding quality. Scholarship based on student engagement theories conceives student involvement as part of building inclusive higher education communities and fostering student self-formation. This chapter discusses, first, the areas and pathways for student involvement in promoting quality. Next it addresses both the rationales and student motivations for such involvement. In the conclusion, more controversial questions concerning student participation in quality assessment and improvement are addressed: acceptance of students as ‘peers’, tokenistic involvement of students in decision processes, and the ‘domestication’ of students. Finally, the chapter argues that research has not caught up with the developments in practice. Several questions are identified for future exploration.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

Students need to develop vibrant networks of mentors from whom they can seek input for problems they face or decisions they need to make. By leaning on their support networks, leaders are able to make the best decision possible with all the data related to an issue they are trying to resolve. This chapter covers the many different ways an educator can approach student growth and guidance and how mentorship and networks can play a role. First, mentorship is defined through a review of the current literature, followed by an examination of the benefits of mentorship to mentors and mentees alike. The chapter provides examples of mentoring programs that students have found useful and outlines lessons learned as a result of program implementation. The chapter ends with an examination of the concept of networking and how it can support personal and professional growth.

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Anna B. Kayes, David M. Kaplan, Jane Burdett and Sharon L. O'Sullivan

Once employees have been hired, it cannot be assumed that they will flourish in their jobs. Job specifications – even ones that have been recently updated – will change as the competitive landscape changes, and employees’ skills need continually to be assessed, developed, and managed. How organizations develop their talents, especially in knowledge work environments, is key to organizational competitiveness: being able to compete in a constantly changing, global marketplace and ensuring employees continue to grow and develop in their careers. Featured among these exercises are one two which enable students to develop a training plan, another which requires critical thinking to discover what went wrong in such a process, and the first which takes a broad look at the war on talent.

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Teaching Human Resource Management

An Experiential Approach

Edited by Suzanne C. de Janasz and Joanna Crossman

Filled with over 65 valuable case studies, role plays, video-based discussions, simulations, reflective exercises and other experiential activities, Teaching Human Resource Management enables HR professors, practitioners and students at all levels, to engage and enhance knowledge and skills on a wide range of HR concepts. This book breathes life into the teaching of Human Resource Management and readers will be able to better relate theoretical concepts to workplace decisions and dilemmas.
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Teaching Leadership

Bridging Theory and Practice

Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

We can teach leadership. The authors share their personal experiences of how they have bridged theory and practice in curricular and co-curricular settings to set the pace and tone for leadership development and life-long learning. Starting from theories of leadership, they share how it can be taught with rigor, intentionality, structure, and organization. Assessment is key from conception to implementation. Scholars, educators, and practitioners from different fields and professions are invited to adjust, adopt, and adapt concepts, ideas, methods and processes discussed in this book to their own institutional contexts and reality.
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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

When reviewing the promotional materials of most colleges and universities in the United States, we are hard pressed to find any without the use of the word “leader” or “leadership.” Yet, when we delve deeper into their catalogues and websites, the numbers dwindle. Teaching leadership goes beyond mission statements in which leadership is articulated. This chapter reviews the evolution of teaching leadership and its place in higher education. We approach the teaching of leadership as having three conceptual approaches – as an intellectual enterprise (the study of leadership), a focus on competency-building (leadership training), and the promotion of leadership development. We frame the teaching of leadership through four levels of analysis – individual, team/community, organizational, and global. At the end of the chapter, we combine these two perspectives (the three conceptual approaches and the four levels of analysis) to create an overarching map of the different topics that are used in the teaching of leadership.

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Sibusiso Moyo

African higher education institutions, and universities in particular, tend to rely heavily on government funding and subsidies. In recent times there has been more pressure to account for expenditure on higher education to both the government and public. For instance, in South Africa, the #FeesMustFall movement in 2016 saw the demand for free higher education. Coupled with this increase in the demand for higher education, is the increase in enrolments at undergraduate level and the demand for additional resources and accountability. The chapter contributes to the case for building useful institutional reporting systems for research and innovation within the African context by looking at vision and mission statements of a selected number of African universities and linking these to the contexts in which these institutions find themselves regionally and globally. The discussion is embedded within organisational cultures and the competing values framework. Four universities selected from South Africa and one from Uganda are used for the case study in order to understand the complexity within which HEIs find themselves. Issues of access, transformation, governance and accountability are elucidated.

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Emeline Jerez and Christian Blanco

Policy and practices of quality assurance in higher education have followed a progressive development path in Chile. However, after a crisis that undermined trust among stakeholders, over the last decade demands for major reforms have increasingly constrained the governmental agenda. Following national and international reviews involving virtually every actor in the system, boosted by a context of weakened legitimacy, Chile is now on the verge of a new wave of reform in the area. Under an evolutionary perspective on quality assurance, it is believed that the current policy stage entails an opportunity for the system to evolve to higher thresholds of complexity by means of building on a much more mature and consolidated arrangement. Aiming to explore the consistency levels between the identified quality assurance challenges and the policy actions, the chapter suggests criteria for assessing both processes using a ten-dimensional scheme based upon key features of a quality assurance framework. By bringing together the dimensional analysis and the evolutionary perspective, obstacles are identified which are preventing the current system from reaching those higher levels of complexity.