Browse by title

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 85,326 items

You do not have access to this content

Hansjörg Herr

In Marx's explanation of functional income distribution, wages are given as a basket of goods needed for the reproduction needs of the working class. Profits are then the remaining part of income creation. Marx's explanation of functional income distribution has several theoretical and practical shortcomings. The Keynesian paradigm in the traditional works of Keynes and Kalecki provides alternative explanations of functional income distribution. Here the profit rate is given by processes in the financial market and the degree of financialisation. Also the degree of monopoly influences functional income distribution. The Keynesian and Kaleckian approach allows a plausible interpretation of the changes in functional income distribution during recent decades.

You do not have access to this content

Mary Warnock

This article reflects upon the concept of ‘loyalty’ to the planet and whether, in the final analysis, such ‘loyalty’ is really a matter of justice at all. Beginning with a meditation upon injustice, and on the notion of rights, this article traces the developments in philosophy that have increasingly enabled a sense of being-in-the-world and renewed appreciation of the lived connections between self and nature. Moving from the radical interiority of Descartes to the public nature of language, this article suggests that in the final analysis, ‘loyalty to the planet’ is more a matter of love than of justice.

You do not have access to this content

Fritz Helmedag

Marx's and Keynes's analyses of capitalism complement each other well. In a largely general model including the public sector and international trade it is shown that the labour theory of value provides a sound foundation to reveal the factors influencing employment. Workers buy ‘necessaries’ out of their disposable wages from an integrated basic sector, whereas the ‘luxury’ division's revenues spring from other sources of income. In order to maximize profits, the wage–good industry controls the level of unit labour costs. Ultimately, effective demand governs the volume of work. On this basis, implications for economic policy are outlined.

You do not have access to this content

Maria Bargh and Estair Van Wagner

Land and natural resources are at the core of conflicts between Indigenous peoples and Settlers in settler-colonial nations. This article explores the coloniality of natural resource law in the context of the New Zealand Crown Minerals Act 1991 (CMA) Block Offer process; the annual tender process for mineral prospecting and exploration. While there is often strong Māori participation, we will argue that Aotearoa New Zealand settler-colonial mining law is structured in such a way that Māori views rarely influence the substantive outcomes of mineral exploration decisions. Through a case study of the 2013 Epithermal Gold Block Offer in the Central North Island, we will explore the factors that might contribute to the mismatch between the level of Māori participation and the influence of Māori views on final decisions in the Block Offer process. We examine how different views are valued by bureaucrats within New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals, a government agency within the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, and explore whether the criteria applied to Māori submissions genuinely and appropriately reflect the full range of interests, aspirations and concerns raised by Māori participants. In particular, we consider how mining regulation is structured to exclude Māori law and jurisdiction in order to uphold settler-colonial authority over key natural resources and extractivist economies. Finally, we consider alternatives to the CMA process and explore the potential to ensure substantive outcomes that better reflect the Māori views and interests. In doing so we point to the need to shift from colonial extractivist models of natural resources law towards Settler-Indigenous partnerships in relation to environmental planning in settler-colonial states.

You do not have access to this content

Elena Blanco and Anna Grear

Set against the colonial and neo-colonial unevenness of the globalized neoliberal order, this article offers a critical reading of legal personhood and jurisdiction as mechanisms of privilege and predation. Transnational corporations (TNCs) are, we suggest, the ultimate insider construct for the neoliberal capitalist-techno order. Meanwhile, increasing numbers of corporeal human beings on the move as the marginalized products of that same order (especially refugees and migrants) are confronted by boundaries and barriers all too material in their effect.

In an age of anxiety-driven border hardening against mass human migration and of seamless, instantaneous movements of transnational capital and corporate location across jurisdictional boundaries, we examine the patterns of injustice implicated in and between these phenomena, tracing a Eurocentric logic visible in the complex continuities between coloniality, capitalism and the production of precarity in the Anthropocene.

You do not have access to this content

Andrea Terzi

With the implementation of the Eurosystem's asset purchase programme (APP), national central banks’ TARGET balances have risen. For the European Central Bank, this reflects cross-border payments and portfolio rebalancing in the context of the APP. Minenna et al. (2018) disagree and claim that the causes of rising TARGET balances (2015–2017) have been the persistent current-account surplus of Germany and ‘capital flight.’ This comment explains that rising TARGET balances occur under specific monetary policy configurations and that the context of the APP was critical to account for rising TARGET balances. It then questions the decomposition approach employed by the authors by arguing that it shows accounting correspondences, not causality, and concludes that there is no established two-way association between TARGET balances and actual vulnerabilities of the euro area.

This content is available to you

Fausto Pocar

This content is available to you

Curtis A. Bradley

You do not have access to this content

Curtis A. Bradley

This insightful research review provides an analysis of the modern literature on foreign relations law. The topics explored include; the history of foreign relations law, the role of the courts in adjudicating foreign affairs disputes, executive power over foreign affairs, the domestic status of treaties, the phenomenon of executive agreements, the judicial application of customary international law, and the distribution of authority over war powers. The review provides a unique birds-eye view of the entire field and promises to be an invaluable tool for academics as well as a fascinating read for those interested in the subject.
You do not have access to this content

Fausto Pocar

This timely literature review analyses the most influential legal scholarship on the enforcement of human rights at institutional level, both regional and international. It includes discussion of charter-based and reporting monitoring procedures as well as the role of high commissioners and treaty bodies. The review later focuses on the movement towards establishing quasi-judicial procedures, the judicial enforcement of human rights and interim measures, concluding with a thoughtful consideration of the potential for universal judicial enforcement – a world court of human rights. This insightful study will be an essential research resource for those studying, working or teaching in this important field.