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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

The last chapter of this book includes the reflections of the two co-authors on how to move forward as educators and pave the path for continued learning about leadership studies. It emphasizes key takeaways from the previous chapters. Readers will find different aspects of the book more valuable depending on their individual interests and level of experience and maturity in developing and implementing leadership programs. This chapter lays out the priorities that should inform all educators when teaching leadership.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

In this chapter, we explore the intellectual development of leadership studies (e.g., the empirical study of leadership, the development of a leadership canon, leadership as a discipline) as a way to suggest different paths that educators might take in developing a leadership curriculum. There is no single formula for developing a rigorous curriculum to expand students’ knowledge of how leadership works. Academic strengths of educators as well as an institution’s traditions may influence the types of courses that are integrated into a leadership program. These choices must provide students with a deeper understanding of the concepts and literary contributions of the leadership canon. Every leadership program obviously will have a different history and reality that will shape the curricular choices that are made. The key to a vibrant leadership curriculum is to be intentional and rigorous in curricular development.

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Jeffrey A. Mello, Joy Turnheim Smith, Beverly J. De Marr, Joseph Seltzer, Vicki Fairbanks Taylor, Cristina Arroyo, Madeline Crocitto and Jason Myrowitz

Even when selection, training, and performance appraisal symptoms work well, conflicts which require intervention and, sometimes, disciplinary action, inevitably arise. Humans are not always kind to one another in their family homes … let alone inside a workplace. What are the nature and origin of typical organizational conflicts? What kinds of issues can be avoided or placed on hold, and which ones require immediate intervention from management or HR? This chapter features eight diverse exercises that explore issues of discrimination, harassment, and even termination.

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Colette A. Frayne, Mary B. Teagarden, Elisabeth K. Kelan, Victoria Mattingly, Kevin M. Walters, Katrina Thompson, Susan Dustin, Elizabeth A. Cooper, Robyn Berkley, Diana Smrt and Gary Stark

Many countries have enacted a set of laws designed to protect individuals and groups from discrimination, for example on the basis of race, gender, age, ability, sexual orientation. Such laws help to ensure equal or fair treatment. In this chapter, we have attempted to focus on the application of such laws, as opposed to clarifying them in specific terms. The eight exercises build student awareness of conscious and unconscious biases and how they can result in unfair, illegal, or discriminatory treatment of individuals and groups. The exercises are designed to be delivered in-class and beyond, encouraging interaction with people out of class, who acknowledge an identity that differs from each student in some way. These kinds of experiential activities also encourage personal reflection and meaningful, deep learning.

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Robyn Berkley, Lynn Bowes, Stacie Chappell, Suzanne C. de Janasz and Jason Myrowitz

In theory, the golden rule should apply to the way in which humans are treated by other humans: Do unto others as you would want them to do unto you. In practice, however, this concept is affected by differences in values, culture, belief systems, and the unequal distribution of power. The expectation that workers are treated fairly, and with respect, is occasionally violated in organizations. Over the years, these violations have been debated, and developed into laws which are intended to protect the parties bound by an employment contract (discussed in the next chapter). Beyond law and legislative acts, there are expectations for ethical and socially responsible behavior, however these expectations are difficult to define – within a culture and, even more so, across different cultures. However, students of HR should be able to understand and apply frameworks for determining the degree to which behavior of individuals and organizations is ethical and socially responsible. The exercises contained in this chapter – ranging from a case on ethics in HR policy to a reflective exercise on how it feels to act in a socially responsible manner – offer students opportunities to apply frameworks to a variety of situations.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

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Beth Zuech Schneider, Vicki R. Whiting, Nicholas D. Rhew and Arlise McKinney

Borders are disappearing, and employees work side by side with other employees from around the world. As more organizations enter new markets and new countries, they need to expatriate talents into foreign lands, and hire locals. Both of these processes require a great deal of information gathering and analysis of various countries’ laws, customs, cultures, and labor supply. Understanding and overcoming the challenges of managing employees in the global workplace is the focus of the following exercises.

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Scott J. Behson, Vicki R. Whiting, Suzanne C. de Janasz, Deb Cohen and Gary Stark

The following exercises don’t fit neatly into one chapter; instead, they feature, and often integrate, multiple HR concepts. Some, like the first two exercises, can be used across the entire semester, enabling students to learn and apply HR concepts across a variety of situations.

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Gama Perruci and Sadhana W. Hall

This chapter is designed to introduce educators to the interdisciplinary connections that have given rise to leadership studies. While many leadership programs trace their roots to student affairs offices, the current academic study of leadership is often housed in various academic departments. The chapter begins by engaging the reader in this question about the interdisciplinary teaching of leadership: Is it a dialogue of disciplines or a pedagogical tool for understanding human relations? Next, the chapter reviews the different approaches that educators have taken to advance the teaching of leadership, including pre-professional, liberal-arts, and topic-based programs. The chapter ends with a discussion about the dynamic of finding an academic home for leadership studies.

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Edited by Suzanne C. de Janasz and Joanna Crossman