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Albert N. Link and John T. Scott

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Colin Jones

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Colin Jones

Environment pierces to the very heart of life. If we probe to the beginnings of life, it is there no less intimately dependent on environment than in its completest manifestations. We never find and never can conceive life pure, unenvironed. (MacIver, 1917: 361)

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Colin Jones

Among all men, whether of the upper or lower orders, the differences are eternal and irreconcilable, between one individual and another, born under absolutely the same circumstances. One man is made of agate, another of oak; one of slate, another of clay. The education of the first is polishing; of the second, seasoning; of the third, rending; of the fourth, moulding. It is of no use to season the agate; it is vain to try and polish the slate; but both are fitted, by the qualities they possess, for services in which they may be honoured. (Ruskin, 1917: 198)

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Colin Jones

You need only claim the events of your life to make yourself yours. When you truly possess all you have been and done… you are fierce with reality. (Scott-Maxwell, 1983: 42)

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Colin Jones

Nature attains perfection, but man never does. There is a perfect ant, a perfect bee, but man is perpetually unfinished. He is both an unfinished animal and an unfinished man. It is this incurable unfinishedness which sets man apart from other living things. For, in the attempt to finish himself, man becomes a creator. Moreover, the incurable unfinishedness keeps man perpetually immature, perpetually capable of learning and growing. (Hoffer, 1973: 3)

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Colin Jones

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Colin Jones

The resource of highest value in adult education is the learner’s experience. If education is life, then life is also education. Too much of learning consists of vicarious substitution of some one else’s experience and knowledge. (Lindeman, 1926: 9–10)

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Colin Jones

It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent on each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us. … There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved. (Darwin, 1859: 489-490)

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Edited by Albert N. Link and John T. Scott

New technologies, with their practical contributions, provide social value. The chapters in this volume view this social value from a program evaluation perspective, and the focus of the evaluations is the generation of new technology funded by public sector agencies. The authors provide important background on methodology and application and show that it is relevant not only to the established scholars and practitioners, but also to students.