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Edited by Ada Scupola and Lars Fuglsang

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Xue Han and Jorge Niosi

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The Revolution in Energy Technology

Innovation and the Economics of the Solar Photovoltaic Industry

Xue Han and Jorge Niosi

The solar photovoltaic sector is moving forward very fast, both in terms of its own technological advancement and its standing among global renewable energy technologies. Rapid increases in solar cell efficiencies, fast technical change in solar batteries and solar glass, and economies of scale in production fuel its rapid adoption, and it is becoming clear that existing forecasts about its adoption need to be updated extensively. This timely and distinctive examination of the economic side of the field takes into account solar PV’s recent and growing lead among renewable energies competing to replace fossil fuels.
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Services, Experiences and Innovation

Integrating and Extending Research

Edited by Ada Scupola and Lars Fuglsang

Whilst innovation has traditionally focused on manufacturing, recently research surrounding service innovation has been flourishing. Furthermore, as consumers become ever more sophisticated and look for experiences, a research field investigating this topic has also emerged. This book aims to develop an integrated approach to the field of experience and services through innovation by showing that it is necessary to take several factors into account. As such, it makes a substantial and compelling contribution to the interdependencies between innovation, services and experience research.
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Xue Han and Jorge Niosi

Chapter 2 extracts the key points of the solar PV sectors in terms of industrial performance, technologies and regulations. This chapter acts as the foundation for understanding further specific studies in the following chapter.

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Zhigang Wang and Mark Wing

The gradual increase in the output of China's online literature industry and strengthening of the copyright development chain has yet to result in any standardization of copyright management. This article provides an analysis of discrimination against online literature writers, as their writing is usually considered less creative than conventionally published work. This paper then analyses the rampant piracy and plagiarism plaguing online literature in China and the difficulty authors encounter in protecting their rights. After examining this environment, the article discusses the reasons behind the dysfunctional copyright ecology facing online literature writers. It focuses on the position of the online literature platform, namely the potential capital advantage of the platform and associated weakening of the ‘elite’ label applied to certain online literature writers following from the freemium business model. Unclear management from the government is also addressed.

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Luis Felipe Beltrán-Morales, David J Jefferson, Ileana Serrano Fraire and Monica Alandete-Saez

In this article, we evaluate an initiative recently launched by the national government in Mexico to create ‘Patenting Centers’ in various universities and research institutions in diverse regions of the country. We focus particularly on elucidating how the installation of these Patenting Centers has augmented the number of national filings for intellectual property (IP) protection, and how the Centers have contributed to increasing the quality of IP applications. Furthermore, we analyze how the Mexican Patenting Centers have qualitatively contributed to fostering local cultures of innovation, for example through capacity-building activities directed towards scientific researchers. We also attempt to understand how the Patenting Centers have supported processes of technology transfer and commercialization, which we evaluate by examining a case study from the Northwest Biological Research Center (CIBNOR). Our findings indicate that the Mexican Patenting Centers have contributed to increasing IP protection activity in various regions of the country, and that they have augmented interactions between public research institutions and the productive sector. We conclude with suggestions for how the Patenting Center model may be further assessed in the future, to ensure that the government's mission of fostering endogenous innovation and the creation of a knowledge-based economy may continue to be realized.

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Edited by Johanna Gibson