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Sales skills for researchers

Insights from When Things Go Wrong

Colin Hughes

Gaining access to respondents can be a significant challenge and a source of frustration for many researchers. When seeking access, researchers often waste time speaking to non-decision makers and fail to sell the value of their research. This short vignette highlights the importance of sales skills for researchers.

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Rolling with the punches

Insights from When Things Go Wrong

Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Julia Carins and Christiane Stock

Most research projects require a plan which establishes expectations for colleagues working in the project to ensure that reports on milestones and deliverables are clearly communicated to all research stakeholders. So what happens when plans fail? We all know that the very best plans can and do fail, and this chapter shares some of our stories of failure but rolling with the punches to keep moving forward.

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Annika Klopp and Christoph U. Schmid

Switzerland, Austria and Germany have the highest share of tenants in Europe. Economically, rental tenancies constitute an efficient debt financing of housing needs; renting is thus more beneficial than owner occupation. This finding gives rise to a basic thesis: To the extent that balanced regulation contributes to high shares of rental tenancies, it also accounts for macroeconomic benefits. For Austria, this thesis may be confirmed only partially with respect to the well-regulated and organised social rental sector funded by the state. However, private rentals are covered by complicated regimes most of which stipulate forms of statutory rent control. The Swiss case is more in point: Tenancy law is regulated in a relatively balanced way although there is a certain pro landlord-tendency. However, the resort to tenancies may also be explained by the lack of viable alternatives, due to the lack of social housing, very high prices and a prohibitive tax treatment. The German case is most in point. Regulation is relatively equilibrated, though with slight advantages for tenants; the ‘Mietspiegel’, a statistical compilation of comparative rents, constitutes a viable compromise solution between free market rents and rents fixed by statute. Yet, the current balance of private rental markets is fragile.

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Marietta E.A. Haffner

In many Western European countries including the Netherlands and France, the market share of private renting decreased massively after World War II. Often strict rent control is deemed to also be responsible for this development. Yet more recent development indicates a further decline of the sector in the Netherlands, whereas its market share stabilized in France. This chapter explains the development of the private rental sector resulting from private individual or person landlords leaving the sector in the Netherlands, but staying in operation as landlords in France. While in France the institutional landlords/investors retreated, in the Netherlands they kept up their rental stock until the subsidization of new investment became less attractive and in the end was abolished. How ‘rent tenure’-neutral subsidization seems to have played a role, is the central focus of this chapter.

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Vivien A. Schmidt

In recent years participatory governance has been successfully promoted and presented itself as a normatively attractive ideal in light of which we might accomplish many of the far-reaching transformations modern democratic politics are exposed to, relating, firstly, to the shift from government to governance; secondly, to the progressive denationalization of politics in many subject domains; thirdly, to citizens’ rising disaffection with representative politics in the purely aggregative and elitist mode; and, finally, to a deepening concern for providing the moral and epistemic underpinnings of the rationality of political processes of collective will formation and decision making. Yet, in spite of this attractive story, as it stands, widespread enthusiasm about this emergent pattern of democratic (self-) transformation is still confronted with severe and inexorable skepticism which is explained in the chapter with reference to three constitutive paradoxes of participatory governance. Only when acknowledging these can we then see what is especially attractive to the more recent systemic turn in participatory governance – a turn which shows its full force only when elaborated in light of a principle of reflexive integration which is at the heart of the idea of democratic self-transformation.

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Risk management and adaptation in oil and gas commodity resource markets

Organizational Strategy, Behaviour and Dynamics

Connie Van der Byl and Birgitte Grøgaard

The oil and gas industry is vital in the global economy. It is also a turbulent industry, characterized by market volatility and exogenous shocks. Yet, the oil and gas industry has largely been ignored in the management literature. In this chapter, we highlight some of the risks contributing to industry uncertainty and examine how firms adapt and develop resilience. Using the dynamic capabilities framework, we describe how successful firms develop capabilities for sensing, seizing and reconfiguring to mitigate the risks and capitalize on opportunities.

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Robert Smith

This inspirational small business story is based on an ‘abstract’ form of entrepreneurial leadership demonstrated by James Watt and Martin Dickie, two young Scottish entrepreneurs who formed the hugely successful brewery BrewDog in 2007. Their rise has been rapid in the global recession. Their avowed ‘Punk business ethos’ flouts business convention but they are not entrepreneurial leaders in the accepted iconic, idolatry sense we expect from those so titled. This chapter examines entrepreneurship in a small or medium-sized enterprise context through investigating abstract phenomenon associated with this confusing concept. The author looks at the company and iconic brand as an abstract, protean form of entrepreneurial leadership. The theoretical basis used is that of Johnston and Scholes’s cultural web, to present stories and images associated with their particular ethos of leadership.

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Maximiliano E. Korstanje

In this section the author discusses the role of hospitality as a configurator of nationhood and the nation-state. Here two important assumptions should be discussed. At a first glimpse, we detail how the nation-state disposed of disciplinary mechanisms to control nomadic groups. The imposition of national borders were confronted with old lifestyles which were proper for aboriginals. The arrival of nationhood ran in parallel with the acceptance of hospitality as a mainstream cultural value of cosmopolitan societies. Second, the idea of free transit, where the theory of mobilities begins is not new. It comes from the political usages of hospitality to discipline aborigines in the conquest of the Americas. As Anthony Pagden has amply validated, the conquest of the Americas was ideologically legitimated by the tergiversations of two significant theories coined in Europe; the thesis of free transit and the Western model of hospitality.

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Ronit Yitshaki and Fredric Kropp

Research in entrepreneurial motivation often suffers from narrow theoretical articulation and a lack of integration of the psychological, cognitive, and affective aspects. Over the past decade there has been renewed interest in affective components of entrepreneurial motivation including passion, compassion, and founder’s self- and social identities and the role they play in opportunity recognition and venture formation. This chapter provides a new understanding of entrepreneurial motivation based on an integrative review of cognitive and affective motivational constructs and opportunity recognition. We developed a process model and provide directions for future research.

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Reviewers

Theory and Applications

Edited by Eve Mitleton-Kelly, Alexandros Paraskevas and Christopher Day