Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 289 items :

Clear All
This content is available to you

Pierre-Marie Dupuy

You do not have access to this content

Pierre-Marie Dupuy

International custom “as evidence of a general practice accepted as law”, is considered one of the two main sources of international law as it primarily derives from the conduct of sovereign States, but is also closely connected with the role of the international judge when identifying the applicable customary rule, a function it shares with the bodies in charge of its codification (and progressive development), starting with the International Law Commission. Though mainly considered to be general international law, international custom has a complex relationship with many specific fields of law and specific regions of the world. The editor provides comprehensive research published in the last seven decades, invaluable to everyone interested in the field of customary international law.
You do not have access to this content

Pierre-Marie Dupuy

You do not have access to this content

Pierre-Marie Dupuy

You do not have access to this content

Hayleigh Bosher

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies is evidentially growing steadily across all sectors and industries. This includes in the creation and development of music, which raises some interesting copyright questions about authorship, ownership and infringement. This chapter will look at the impact of AI on these principles of copyright in the context of music creativity.

You do not have access to this content

Hayleigh Bosher

Following on from the previous chapter which considered the impact of artificial intelligence technology on copyright and the music industry, this chapter considers another type of technological develop; blockchain. This chapter discusses the use of blockchain technology in copyright registrations, licence and payments, and copyright enforcement.

This content is available to you

Philipp Dann and Arun K. Thiruvengadam

This chapter introduces the volume that aims to fill an astonishing gap in the burgeoning literature on comparative constitutional studies: a comparison of democratic constitutionalism in India and the EU. It posits that while these two polities seem hard to compare at first sight (a state in the Global South and a regional organization in the Global North), they share a certain socio-political quality as continental polities beyond the conventional understanding (and size) of nation-states. And equally importantly, they share a core belief and a normative anchor – that democracy is possible even in vastly diverse societies of continental scale and that a constitutional framework is best able to secure the ideals of collective autonomy and individual dignity. Against this background, the chapter sketches the larger context of the underlying research project and its three larger aims: to start a comparative conversation about Indian and European experiences of constitutionalism; to showcase a comparative approach that we call ‘slow comparison’; and to deepen our understanding of democratic constitutionalism and the law of democracy in multinational and socio-culturally diverse polities.

You do not have access to this content

Pritam Baruah and Uwe Volkmann

A comparison of democracy between India and the European Union faces, among other things, the problem that democracy itself is a notoriously fuzzy concept that can be interpreted and filled in many different ways. This article tries to make the best of this fuzziness by taking different conceptualizations of democracy and using them as a lens or analytical grid to assess the development of democracy in both systems. The main distinction is made between those conceptualizations that understand democracy as a value in itself and then focus on the quality of the democratic process, and those that see democracy mainly as a means to achieve other goals and accordingly focus on its output side. In this light, the input legitimacy concerns in India nowadays are almost as severe as those to its output legitimacy, whereas the European Union was in the past mainly said to have a deficit in the quality of democratic participation. However, a legal comparison between the systems eventually reveals the problem of an overly demanding concept of democracy as such: Democracy is then quickly overloaded with expectations it can only fail to meet.

This content is available to you

Hayleigh Bosher

You do not have access to this content

Hayleigh Bosher

This chapter explains how the contracts that you might have with these people work. It includes a basic introduction to what a contract is and how they work and then provides some information on some of the relevant contracts that you will come across in the music industry; collaborator agreements including band and group contracts, as well as contracts individual contributors such as songwriters, vocalists, producers and session musicians. It then covers the main music deals; management contracts, recording contracts and publishing contracts. Lastly, it mentions sponsorship, product placement, influencer and merchandise agreements.