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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

Technology plays a significant role in doctoral leadership studies providing a channel for teaching, learning, research, and administrative processes. Existing and new programs seek to leverage technology-mediated learning in order to provide access, convenience, enriched learning, and develop new pathways to achieve a doctorate. Advancing Doctoral Leadership Education Through Technology offers ideas, experiences, and practices relevant to doctoral faculty, chairs and directors, administrators, researchers, and doctoral students interested in learning and research in technology and leadership education.
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Kenneth A. Perez and Heather C. Lench

Awe is a positive emotion that occurs when people are in the presence of something extraordinary and beyond their typical experiences, from transformative views of majestic landscapes to the face of one’s child. Recent evidence suggests that more everyday experiences can also evoke mild feelings of awe, and that these feelings can have benefits for people’s lives. Accumulating evidence suggests that awe has several benefits for physical health, and might reduce the likelihood of developing chronic conditions. Awe also tends to prompt self-transcendence, resulting in the sense of a “small self” that shifts people’s focus towards others and the world around them. People who have experienced awe are more prosocial and helpful. They are also more creative and less likely to use stereotypes in their decision making. Over time, there is evidence that awe can improve well-being and satisfaction. Considering the grandness of the emotion of awe, it does not seem intuitive to establish a connection between awe and a relatively ordinary workplace setting. However, this chapter reviews several directions for organizations and individuals to improve their work environment and climate by fostering a sense of awe in the workplace.

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Edited by Laura Hyatt and Stuart Allen

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Peter N. Stearns

A growing interest in happiness has been a crucial aspect of modern Western culture since the Enlightenment. Its evolution, alongside the emergence of new labor forms in factories and offices, suggests an obvious, though difficult, relationship and this forms the focus of the present essay on happiness and work in industrial society. Developments in the nineteenth century almost certainly reduced job satisfaction for many workers in contrast to artisanal or even rural experience. At the same time new issues––such as the relationship between what would ultimately be called personality and the work ethic, or the growing importance of measuring work by wages––took shape that have conditioned the interaction between jobs and happiness ever since. Formal interest in workplace happiness increased measurably during the first half of the twentieth century, as experts and management sought to promote greater job stability and productivity while reducing labor unrest. Several conflicting approaches emerged, complicating the assessment of actual results. Job happiness probably lagged behind the surge of interest, though some connections can be explored. Finally, at the outset of the twenty-first century, a new commitment to well-being on the job suggests a new stage in the elaboration of ideas about workplace emotion, inviting another evaluation of the relationship between actual emotional trends.

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Edited by Dirk Lindebaum, Deanna Geddes and Peter J. Jordan

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Edited by Dirk Lindebaum, Deanna Geddes and Peter J. Jordan

What novel theoretical insights can be gleaned by comparing our theoretical understanding of emotion in relation to how we 'talk about’ emotion at work? Drawing from psychological and sociological thinking, leading emotion researchers respond to this question for ten common and powerful emotions at work. The chapters detail various conditions under which our study of emotions and our talk about them can be at odds or reinforce each other in organizations, and how these differences impact subsequent consequences for organizations and their members.
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Paul Harvey and Marie T. Dasborough

Talking about schadenfreude feelings can have effects that differ from the intended social functions of the emotion. In this chapter, we contend that schadenfreude is a complex emotion with both positive and negative valence. As such, socially sharing the emotion can have upsides as well as downsides, depending on how it is perceived by others. We illustrate this point by highlighting the benefits of sharing schadenfreude, as well as the negative perceptions that may form regarding the person expressing the schadenfreude. We propose that schadenfreude can play important social functional roles and that talking about it provides valuable information for observers. A number of situational and individual factors––which are not well understood––appear to help determine if the person expressing the schadenfreude is viewed positively or negatively by others. We conclude our chapter with a discussion of practical advice for individuals, as well as directions for future research.

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Hannes Zacher and Megan J. Bissing-Olson

In this chapter, we first explain what is meant by between-person variability (or interindividual differences) and within-person variability (or intraindividual variability and change) in employee pro-environmental behaviour. Second, we describe two quantitative daily diary studies that examined both between-person and within-person variability in employee pro-environmental behaviour. Third, we present a conceptual framework for investigating person- and context-related predictors of stable between-person differences and dynamic within-person variability in employee pro-environmental behaviour. Fourth, we discuss different research designs and analytical strategies to investigate between- and within-person variability in employee pro-environmental behaviour. We conclude by discussing implications for organisational practice.

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Aharon Tziner and Edna Rabenu

Having reviewed the various angles of performance appraisal (PA) formats and their potential, as well as trends in the marketplace towards alternatives to classical PA, we now turn to a wider perspective and theoretically anchored approach to the whole notion of performance appraisal systems (PASs) and performance management (PM) techniques that brazenly broadens the scope of discussion concerning the future of performance evaluation in general. The discussion is based on Angelo DeNisi and Caitlin E. Smith’s (2016) ground-breaking treatise, ‘Performance appraisal, performance management, and firm-level performance: A review, a proposed model, and new directions for future research’ (2014). The central question addressed in their paper is: While it is intuitively obvious that aggregates of increased individual performance should translate into improved organizational performance (and teams would appear to present a microcosm of that notion), what, nevertheless, is the real relationship between individual performance improvements that are outcomes of performance appraisals (and other performance management techniques) and what DeNisi and Smith (2014) call firm-level performance? In the paper, the authors argue that the direct links are tenuous and, consequently, they build up a thoroughly substantiated case for a completely new model of performance evaluation that expands the discussion on performance appraisal (rating formats) from the relatively narrow confines of traditional performance appraisal to the wider domain of performance management. The reader is referred to the complete paper for an in-depth coverage. Based on DeNisi and Smith’s admirable odyssey through the literature in search of the genie that links performance appraisal, performance management, and firm-level performance, we are satisfied to recount the key themes in the paper that, inter alia, demonstrate where research can and should be heading.