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How to Make your Doctoral Research Relevant

Insights and Strategies for the Modern Research Environment

Edited by Friederike Welter and David Urbano

Everyone wants their research to be read and to be relevant. This exciting new guide presents a broad range of ideas for enhancing research impact and relevance. Bringing together researchers from all stages of academic life, it offers a far-reaching discussion of strategies to optimise relevancy in the modern research environment.
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Edited by Friederike Welter and David Urbano

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Edited by Keith Townsend, Mark N.K. Saunders, Rebecca Loudoun and Emily A. Morrison

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How to Keep your Doctorate on Track

Insights from Students’ and Supervisors’ Experiences

Edited by Keith Townsend, Mark N.K. Saunders, Rebecca Loudoun and Emily A. Morrison

The path of a doctoral student can feel challenging and isolating. This guide provides doctoral students with key ideas and support to kick-start a doctoral journey, inspire progress and complete their thesis or dissertation. Featuring observations from experienced supervisors, as well as the reflections of current and recent postgraduate researchers, this intimate and entertaining book offers vital insights into the critical moments in any doctoral experience.
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Edited by Mike Wright, David J. Ketchen, Jr. and Timothy Clark

This expanded second edition of a classic career guide offers fascinating insight into the publishing environment for the management discipline, drawing on a wealth of knowledge and experiences from leading scholars and top-level journal editors. Responding to the continuing emphasis on publishing in the top journals, this revised, updated and extended guide offers invaluable tips and advice for anyone looking to publish their work in these publications.
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Edited by Mike Wright, David J. Ketchen, Jr. and Timothy Clark

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Edited by David W. Stewart and Daniel M. Ladik

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Daniel M. Ladik and David W. Stewart

The (most) common mistake is not to “tell a story,” but only assemble different related parts. “Telling a good story” means to critically analyze what has been done before and demonstrate convincingly why something is changing. A significant contribution to knowledge does not happen in isolation and needs to be contextualized to the current situation.

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John H. Roberts, Ujwal Kayande and Stefan Stremersch

We aim to investigate the impact of marketing science articles and tools on the practice of marketing. This impact may be direct (e.g., an academic article may be adapted to solve a practical problem) or indirect (e.g., its contents may be incorporated into practitioners' tools, which then influence marketing decision making). We use the term “marketing science value chain” to describe these diffusion steps, and survey marketing managers, marketing science intermediaries (practicing marketing analysts), and marketing academics to calibrate the value chain. In our sample, we find that (1) the impact of marketing science is perceived to be largest on decisions such as the management of brands, pricing, new products, product portfolios, and customer/market selection, and (2) tools such as segmentation, survey-based choice models, marketing mix models, and pre-test market models have the largest impact on marketing decisions. Exemplary papers from 1982 to 2003 that achieved dual - academic and practice - impact are Guadagni and Little (1983) and Green and Srinivasan (1990). Overall, our results are encouraging. First, we find that the impact of marketing science has been largest on marketing decision areas that are important to practice. Second, we find moderate alignment between academic impact and practice impact. Third, we identify antecedents of practice impact among dual impact marketing science papers. Fourth, we discover more recent trends and initiatives in the period 2004-2012, such as the increased importance of big data and the rise of digital and mobile communication, using the marketing science value chain as an organizing framework.

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John O. Summers

A primary mission of institutions of higher learning is the generation and dissemination of knowledge. The low acceptance rates at the leading research journals in marketing, typically in the single digits to low teens, suggests the need to increase the quality of the research manuscripts produced. This article presents a set of guidelines for researchers aspiring to do scholarly research in marketing. Discussed are issues such as developing the necessary research skills, conceptualizing the study, constructing the research design, writing the manuscript, and responding to reviewers. Also presented are the author’s personal observations concerning the current state of research in marketing.