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Edited by Edward W. Fuller

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Edited by Edward W. Fuller

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Edited by Edward W. Fuller

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A Source Book on Early Monetary Thought

Writings on Money before Adam Smith

Edited by Edward W. Fuller

This volume contains thirty-seven contributions from the most significant early developers of monetary economics. Starting with Aristotle, the collection tracks the development of the modern theory of money through the ages by thinkers like Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Jean Buridan, Martin de Azpilcueta, John Locke, Richard Cantillon, David Hume, and A.R.J Turgot.
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Nadia E. Nedzel

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Nadia E. Nedzel

Grounded in history and written by a law professor, this book is a scholarly yet jargon-free explanation of the differences between the common and civil law concepts of the rule of law, and details how they developed out of two different cultural views of the relationships between law, individuals, and government. The author shows how those differences lead to differences in economic development, entrepreneurship, and corporate governance.  
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Steven Kates

I will only say it here at the very end, although it ought to be clear from the text. I have written a book that more or less states that pretty well the whole of mainstream economic theory is worthless in devising policy. Virtually none of it will assist anyone in making decisions on how to make an economy prosper. It may be great for writing aimless papers that end up published in major journals, and it may provide cover for governments wishing to waste enormous sums of money on projects that take their fancy, but there is nothing I can see that throws light on how an economy works or what to do to make an economy grow more rapidly.

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Steven Kates

Economic theory reached its zenith of analytical power and depth of understanding in the middle of the nineteenth century among John Stuart Mill and his contemporaries. This book explains what took place in the ensuing Marginal Revolution and Keynesian Revolution that left economists less able to understand how economies operate. It explores the false mythology that has obscured the arguments of classical economists, providing a pathway into the theory they developed.
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Pascal Salin

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Pascal Salin