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Arturo Estrella

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Arturo Estrella

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Arturo Estrella

This timely research review analyses a broad selection of important readings from the existing literature addressing several fundamental questions about recessions. These include what a recession is, the causes and effects of recessions, how to identify and predict recessions, and how to manage the associated risks. The review offers a general overview of the subject, detailed analysis of the readings, discussion of policy implications and acknowledgement of the areas where further research is required, proving itself to be an invaluable source of reference for academics, scholars and practitioners alike.
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Arturo Estrella

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Shahid Yusuf

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Shahid Yusuf

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Shahid Yusuf

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Shahid Yusuf

China’s Global Economic Footprint is large and growing. In recent years, China has contributed a third or more to the growth of the global economy following its meteoric rise starting in the 1980s and gathering momentum in the 1990s. China has convincingly demonstrated the efficacy of investment and export-led growth as a model of development and has achieved economic stardom using a mix of industrial, trade and exchange rate policies within the framework of a gradually reforming socialist market economy. This Research Review explores China’s economy and will be an invaluable resource for China watchers and researchers, students and policymakers interested in learning from East Asia’s development, understanding how China transformed its economy and exploring how China might come to grips with the challenges ahead.
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Shahid Yusuf

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Dennis Collopy

The UK’s Intellectual Property Office (IPO) commissioned research in 2015, by a team led by the University of Hertfordshire, on the impact of social media on Intellectual Property Rights (IPR), specifically to assess the ways in which social media platforms might facilitate IPR infringement in relation to physical goods (‘counterfeits’). The range of trade bodies and sectors involved in the research was shaped by those whose goods were most widely impacted by the availability of illicit goods through social media. Employing the required methodology for assessing the extent of social media’s effect on IPR in physical goods meant there were two key aims: firstly, to compare data and insights from industry, government and consumers to produce a representation of recent levels of counterfeiting within the UK and, secondly, to assess the extent to which this kind of illicit behaviour is moving online and is being facilitated by online social media platforms. The more specific objectives of the study involved assessments of the scale, impact and characteristics of infringements, as well as opportunities for IPR.