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Edited by Samuel Cameron

A Research Agenda for Cultural Economics explores the degree of progress and future directions for the field. An international range of contributors examine thoroughly matters of data quality, statistical methodology and the challenge of new developments in technology. This book is ideal for both emerging researchers in cultural economics and experienced practitioners. It is also relevant to workers in other fields such as cultural policy, public policy, media studies and digital economics.
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Samuel Cameron

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Samuel Cameron

This incisive review analyses the most influential academic research in a burgeoning subject - the economics of music. The literature stems from both mainstream economics journals as well as pertinent works from accountancy, sociology and management sources. Topics discussed include live music, music production, labour markets and ownership and music competitions. This review provides a valuable resource for students and economists involved in this fascinating field, as well as those seeking to enter it.
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Samuel Cameron

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Theocharis Grigoriadis

The chapter discusses the economic logic and political incentives that led to the emergence, peak, and contraction of Kulturkampf in the Catholic lands of Prussia between 1871 and 1878. It argues that Bismarck’s Kulturkampf reveals the fallacies of secularism as a series of enforced state policies: (1) De facto dominance of the religious majority over religious minorities that are in much higher need to preserve their public and social status; (2) Transformation of priests into bureaucratic experts. A game-theoretic model defining Kulturkampf as a static game between priests and the executive is proposed. The willingness of priests to accept the government’s offer and be transformed into bureaucratic experts varies. Individualist priests are easier to recruit as they care more about their personal welfare than social distribution by the Church, whereas the reverse holds for collectivist priests. Nevertheless, the success of the Kulturkampf depends on the effective recruitment of collectivist priests and their entry into formal politics in favor of the executive. The distinction between collectivism and individualism matters here, because priests can either care for the social welfare activity of the Church or their individual welfare. Secularization is not devoid of religion, as it consistently attracts more individualist rather than collectivist priests, and thus advocates a transition to more Protestant forms of government.

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Serena Rovai and Nicola Bellini

This chapter focuses on the profile of the new generation of Chinese creative entrepreneurs in the fashion and luxury industry and investigates, in an exploratory way, the mix of endogenous factors that support their growth in the specific context of the city of Beijing. Based on a review of the elements characterising the present stage of development of this industry and on the results of interviews of two emerging brands within a concept store hosting them, the authors argue that in the struggle to affirm the positive value of Chinese creativity, this new breed of entrepreneurs is developing a syncretic mix of Chinese, Asian and Western elements rather than proposing a nationalistic rediscovery of Chineseness. A Beijing effect is also visible, giving evidence of the relationship between art and fashion. Finally, their growth and success appears in tune with the government’s domestic and international policy.

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Theocharis Grigoriadis

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Michael Keane, Ying Chen and Wen Wen

China’s cultural and creative industries were, and to some extent remain, predicated on material culture, illustrated by the rollout of hundreds of cultural parks and creative clusters. The emphasis within the 13th Five-year Plan is for a digitally connected China. Associated with this is the concept of collaborative innovation. In this chapter the authors question if collaborative innovation will deliver the scale of benefits that the industrial economy has achieved. Certainly, the emphasis on collaboration, efficiency and knowledge is a different blueprint than the industrial clusters of the previous decade, most of which ended up as real estate projects. The chapter looks at so-called incubators, makerspaces and innovation hubs in Hangzhou and Shenzhen. Noting the presence there of commercial digital companies such as Alibaba and Tencent, the authors look at the potential of these spaces to generate digital disruption, and ultimately innovation.

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Roberta Apa, Dina M. Mansour and Silvia Rita Sedita

This chapter explores if creative entrepreneurship in emerging market economies plays a relevant role in the attraction of foreign direct investments (FDI), thus generating the opportunity for economic and social growth. The chapter aims to deepen this important, but still understudied aspect of the economic growth potential of creative industries, using Egypt and the ICT sector as the empirical setting. The analysis of data using the fDi Database and Zephyr on greenfield investments and mergers and acquisitions confirm the relevance of the phenomenon. Moreover, three empirical illustrations allowed the identification of three ideal-types, represented by the three cases selected for the analysis: (1) a start-up that attracted foreign venture capital investments from Silicon Valley (the case of Wuzzuf); (2) a start-up that attracted foreign companies’ investments from Silicon Valley (the case of SysDSoft); (3) a start-up that attracted foreign and local investments from risk capital players (the case of Fawry).