Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 304 items :

  • International Investment Law x
Clear All
You do not have access to this content

Sustainable Trade, Investment and Finance

Toward Responsible and Coherent Regulatory Frameworks

Edited by Clair Gammage and Tonia Novitz

Sustainable development remains a high priority in international politics, as governments seek new methods of managing the consumption of resources while maintaining national economic growth. This timely book explores how the contours and facets of sustainability shape international laws and regulations that govern trade, investment and finance.'
This content is available to you

Kate Miles

Public international law forms an umbrella framework under which its various substantive areas of law sit. The fragmentation this represents is a well-known phenomenon in international law and its implications are manifold.1 A key aspect of this fragmentation and increasing specialisation is the potential for competing norms to encounter each other within the international legal space. There seem to be several mechanisms for resolution of this available in theory, and not a great deal of consistency in practice. One area of contestation in particular has attracted controversy, largely due to the public interest issues implicated, the asymmetries in dispute settlement approaches and the prioritising of one set of norms over another – environmental law, policy and protection objectives and international investment law. The environment/investment nexus became a high-profile international issue through a number of coinciding, parallel channels. On one level, the damaging effects of the activities of multinational corporations on the environment and the health and well-being of local communities formed the backdrop against which international legal issues would be played out. Catastrophic examples of this mode of encounter included the Bhopal disaster, the ‘dieback’ experienced downstream from the BHP copper and gold mine at Ok Tedi and Chevron/Texaco’s leaching of crude oil into the Amazonian ecosystem. At the same time as such micro-level incidents were occurring, global environmental issues that involved multinational corporate operations, such as climate change and the need for the widespread adoption of policies aimed at achieving sustainable development, were appearing in international instruments. The environment/investment nexus also became particularly visible in the late 1990s in the context of investor-state arbitration, when environment- related investment disputes began to be filed with international tribunals, which then triggered extensive protests regarding the negotiation of a Multilateral Agreement on Investment under the auspices of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). From that point onwards, the interaction between the treatment of environmental issues and norms and the rules contained within international investment agreements remained controversial.

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Kate Miles

The Research Handbook on Environment and Investment Law examines one of the most dynamic areas of international law: the interaction between international investment law and environmental law and policy. The Research Handbook takes a thematic approach, analysing key issues in the environment–investment nexus, such as freshwater resources, climate, biodiversity, biotechnology and sustainable development. It also includes sections which explore regional experiences and address practice and procedure, and offers innovative approaches and critical perspectives, including the interface between foreign investment and the environment with human rights, gender, indigenous peoples, and economics.
You do not have access to this content

China-European Union Investment Relationships

Towards a New Leadership in Global Investment Governance?

Edited by Julien Chaisse

Based on original research, and bringing together expert contributors, this book provides a critical analysis of the current law and policy between the EU and China, both internally and internationally. Covering key topics on the subject, this book draws together diverse perspectives into a single collection, and is an invaluable tool for both scholars and practitioners of trade and investment law, as well as human rights and environmental law and policy.
This content is available to you

Edited by Yannick Radi

This content is available to you

Edited by Julien Chaisse

This content is available to you

Edited by Yannick Radi

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Yannick Radi

The interplay between human rights and investments is a key and complex issue in today’s world. To take stock of this importance and to tackle this complexity, this Research Handbook offers a unique multi-faceted approach. It gathers in-depth contributions which focus on the interplay between human rights and investments in various international legal regimes, economic sectors and regions. It also provides thorough analyses of the various types of accountability that may result from the activities of multinational corporations in relation to human rights. This Research Handbook is intended for practitioners, policy-makers, academics and students eager to understand the interaction between human rights and investments in all its dimensions.​
You do not have access to this content

Dirk A. Zetzsche

The chapter begins by considering governance aspects of mutual funds in Ireland, a disproportionately important international jurisdiction for wealth management. It examines the variety of attributes that make Ireland an attractive domicile for funds and asset managers, including the country’s infrastructure, technology, and investment expertise, as well as its well-developed common law and legal system that provides parties with legal certainty. Ireland also offers a 12.5 percent corporate tax rate and no taxes on funds or investors. The chapter closes by considering the possible effects of Brexit arising from the large financial market across the Irish Sea.